duplication

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du·pli·ca·tion

 (do͞o′plĭ-kā′shən, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1.
a. The act or procedure of duplicating.
b. The condition of being duplicated.
2. A duplicate; a replica.
3. Genetics
a. The occurrence of a repeated section of genetic material in a chromosome.
b. The formation of such a duplication.

duplication

(ˌdjuːplɪˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. the act of duplicating or the state of being duplicated
2. a copy; duplicate
3. (Genetics) genetics a mutation in which there are two or more copies of a gene or of a segment of a chromosome

du•pli•ca•tion

(ˌdu plɪˈkeɪ ʃən, ˌdyu-)

n.
1. an act or instance of duplicating.
2. the state of being duplicated.
3. a duplicate.
[1490–1500]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.duplication - a copy that corresponds to an original exactly; "he made a duplicate for the files"
computer backup, backup - (computer science) a copy of a file or directory on a separate storage device; "he made a backup in case the original was accidentally damaged or erased"
copy - a thing made to be similar or identical to another thing; "she made a copy of the designer dress"; "the clone was a copy of its ancestor"
counterpart, similitude, twin - a duplicate copy
match, mate - an exact duplicate; "when a match is found an entry is made in the notebook"
2.duplication - the act of copying or making a duplicate (or duplicates) of something; "this kind of duplication is wasteful"
copying - an act of copying

duplication

noun copying, reproduction, photocopying, xeroxing, replication, photostating the illegal duplication of documents
Translations
نَسْخَه طِبْق الأصْل، إسْتِخْراج نُسْخَه
kopie
gentagelserepetition
másolás
tvírit; fjölritun; tvöföldun
rozmnoženie
çoğaltmakopyalama

duplication

[ˌdjuːplɪˈkeɪʃən] N (= copying) → duplicación f; (= repetition) → repetición f innecesaria

duplication

[ˌdjuːplɪˈkeɪʃən] n [effort] → répétition f

duplication

n (of documents, act) → Vervielfältigung f; (= duplicate)Kopie f; (= double)Doppel nt; (of efforts, work)Wiederholung f; save expenses by avoiding duplication of efforttun Sie nichts zweimal, sparen Sie Kosten

duplication

[ˌdjuːplɪˈkeɪʃn] n (gen) → ripetizione f
we want to avoid duplication of work/effort → vogliamo evitare un doppio lavoro/sforzo

duplicate

(ˈdjuːplikət) adjective
exactly the same as something else. a duplicate key.
noun
1. another thing of exactly the same kind. He managed to find a perfect duplicate of the ring she had lost.
2. an exact copy of something written. She gave everyone a duplicate of her report.
(-keit) verb
to make an exact copy or copies of. He duplicated the letter.
ˌdupliˈcation noun
ˈduplicator (-kei-) noun
a machine for making copies.

du·pli·ca·tion

n. doblez, pliegue; duplicación.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence, KIT expression is related to the prevention of severe pleiotropic effects on other tissues caused by the gene duplication in I/I (KIT).
Gene duplication, although the total number of genes in the genome doesn't vary significantly, some specific genes duplicate one or more times, for example there is one NCoR gene in sea urchin and two in humans.
The male pregnancy aspect was explained through gene duplication, which was also detected in the evolution process of the seahorse.
To the standard paradigm of slow accumulation of random point mutations as the major mechanism of biological variation must now be added new data and concepts of symbiosis, gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, retrotransposition, epigenetic control networks, niche construction, stress-directed mutations, and large-scale reengineering of the genome in response to environmental stimuli.
Such a phylogenetic dichotomy implied that an early gene duplication event led to the evolution of these two major functional forms in Prokaryota (Zardoya, 2005).
Geneticist David Serre of the Cleveland Clinic and others obtained 189 samples of vivax malaria parasites that had infected people in Madagascar and found 100 with the gene duplication.
EMs have 2 functional gene copies and UMs have >2 functional genes from gene duplication, resulting in ultra-rapid metabolism.
If we can work out why gene duplication in this region causes thinness, it might throw up new potential treatments for obesity and appetite disorders.
Since gene duplication with subsequent interaction divergence is one of the primary driving forces in the evolution of genetic systems and little is known about the precise mechanisms and the role of duplication divergence in evolution, these observations might prove beneficial to infer evolution of medically important genes in different taxa.
Researchers in a wide range of biological sciences seize the moment by discussing such topics as understanding gene duplication through biochemistry and population genetics, myths and realities of gene duplication, statistical methods for detecting the functional divergence of gene families, the energy and material cost of gene duplication, evolutionary and functional aspects of genetic redundancy, gene and genome duplication in plants, and whole-genome duplications and the radiation of vertebrates.