gene splicing


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gene splicing

n.
The process in which fragments of DNA from one or more different organisms are combined to form recombinant DNA.

gene′ splic`ing


n.
the act or process of recombining genes from different sources to form new genetic combinations.
[1975–80]
References in periodicals archive ?
Gene splicing is just one of the new methods available to investigate life at the molecular level, which are sometimes referred to under the general term 'biotechnology'.
Twenty years of successful Eucalyptus gene splicing in Brazil is paying off in terms of new investments flooding into the pulp and paper industry and into nonwovens for Brazil's booming middle class in the northeast region.
In fact, The New York Times in 1976 helped fan the flames of "brave new world stuff" by publishing an article titled "New Strains of Life--Or Death," in which Cornell University biochemist Liebe Cavalieri warned that gene splicing could lead to accidental outbreaks of infectious cancer.
Mechanical signals and IGF-I gene splicing in vitro in relation to development of skeletal muscle.
A broad scientific consensus long has held that the newest techniques of biotechnology are no more than an extension, or refinement, of earlier ones applied for centuries, and that gene transfer or modification by gene splicing techniques does not, per se, confer risk.
Moore, noted for her work with gene splicing and messenger RNA, is coming from Brandeis University, UMass announced yesterday.
Interspersed throughout are personal asides, clinical pearls, and lengthy tutorials on basic science topics, such as DNA replication and gene splicing.
What is stopping someone from gene splicing the disease of choice onto heat-loving bacterium?
Ligand activated Ahr signaling leads to disruption of nephrogenesis and altered Wilms' tumor suppressor gene splicing.
While breeding is restricted to genetic exchange between animals and plants that mate naturally, gene splicing transcends this natural restriction to facilitate genetic exchange between totally unrelated organisms, hence creating and introducing new types of organisms into ecosystems which have never known them.
The application of recombinant DNA technology, or gene splicing, to agriculture and food production, once highly touted as having huge public health and commercial potential, has been paradoxically disappointing.