Generation X

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Generation X

n.
The generation following the post-World War II baby boom, especially people born in the United States and Canada from the early 1960s to the late 1970s.

[After Generation X, a novel by Douglas Coupland (born 1961), Canadian writer.]

Generation X′er (ek′sər) n.

Generation X

n
(Sociology) members of the generation of people born between the mid-1960s and the mid-1970s who are seen as being highly educated and underemployed, reject consumer culture, and have little hope for the future
[C20: from the novel Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture by Douglas Coupland]
ˌGeneration ˈXer n

Generation X

(ɛks)
n.
the generation born in the 1960s and 1970s, esp. in the United States.
[after the novel of the same name (1991) by Douglas Coupland]
Generation X'er, n.

generation X

Americans and Western Europeans born between about 1963 and 1979.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.generation X - the generation following the baby boom (especially Americans and Canadians born in the 1960s and 1970s)generation X - the generation following the baby boom (especially Americans and Canadians born in the 1960s and 1970s)
generation - group of genetically related organisms constituting a single step in the line of descent
References in periodicals archive ?
Melbourne, July 11 (ANI): A new research has indicated that Generation Xs are more likely to indulge in risky behaviour than the irresponsible Generation Ys.
Victorian Generation Xs are more likely than Generation Ys to smoke (26 per cent compared with 21 per cent), have unprotected sex with a stranger (40 per cent compared with 30 per cent) and drive while drunk (41 per cent compared with 32 per cent).
As a result, Generation Xs are mistrustful of corporations and are not loyal to any one company.
Keep in mind, Generation X workers already in the workplace are trying daily to make significant changes to accommodate their own styles and desires.
By some accounts the smartest, most technically literate, and most highly educated cohort in history, Generation Xs question many of the assumptions and beliefs of their elders.