Generation Y


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Related to Generation Y: Generation Z

Generation Y

n.
The generation following Generation X, especially people born in the United States and Canada from the early 1980s to the late 1990s.

[Modeled on Generation X.]

Generation Y

n
(Sociology) members of the generation of people born between the early 1980s and mid-1990s who are seen as being discerning consumers with a high disposable income

Generation Y


n.
the generation born in the 1980s and 1990s, esp. in the United States.
[1990–95; patterned after Generation X]

generation Y

People born into technologically advanced societies since 1980.
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper is a part of a doctoral dissertation titled "Media Literacy Learning Schema for Thai Generation Y" of which the ultimate goal is to find a way to effectively provide media literacy (ML) education to Generation Y in Thailand.
The nursing workforce currently includes four generations--veterans, baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y.
Jeffries and Hunte (2003) described the four generations in the workplace as: the Silent Generation born between 1925 and 1945, Baby Boomers born between 1946 and 1964, Generation X born between 1965 and 1980, and Generation Y born between 1981 and 2000.
This year's award went to David Moisey, Senior Manager Retail Development at Samsung Electronics Canada for infusing Samsung stores with the Samsung Smart Fragrance, specially formulated by Tracy Pepe to capture the essence of Generation Y.
Purpose: This paper investigates the impact of Generation Y individuals on the workforce in the USA.
The company's site showcases a collage of photos taken by Generation Y soda drinkers.
How cool brands stay hot; branding to Generation Y, 2d ed.
The smart phone could plausibly be considered the 207th for generation Y," says Cisco's Scottish country manager Donald McLauchlin.
The report examines how Generation Y uses the Internet and mobile devices to connect with the world around them.
For many life producers, the Generation Y market segment, comprising those born between 1978 and 1994, represents a singular paradox.
Research shows benefits brokers and consultants will be selling more voluntary benefits over the next several years, and that Generation Y will account for almost half of the work force by then.
Rsearchers, supervisors, and human resource professionals have long struggled with perfecting management strategies for employees, made more difficult by the presence of distinct personalities of the three most prevalent working generations, namely the Baby Boomers (born between the years 1946 and 1964), Generation X (born between 1965 and 1979), and Generation Y (born between 1980 and 2000).