introgression

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Related to Genetic introgression: introgressive hybridization

in·tro·gres·sion

 (ĭn′trə-grĕsh′ən)
n.
The movement or spread of alleles of one species into the gene pool of another through repeated backcrossing of interspecific hybrids with members of one of the parental species.

[From Latin intrōgressus, past participle of intrōgredī, to step in : intrō-, intro- + gradī, to step; see ghredh- in Indo-European roots.]

in′tro·gres′sive (-grĕs′ĭv) adj.

introgression

(ˌɪntrəˈɡrɛʃən)
n
(Genetics) the introduction of genes from the gene pool of one species into that of another during hybridization
References in periodicals archive ?
Zebu-taurine variation in Y chromosomal DNA: a sensitive assay for genetic introgression in West African trypanotolerant cattle populations.
2009), genetic introgression from cultured to wild conspecifics may reduce the genetic diversity of wild populations (Allendorf & Ryntan 1987, Hedgecock & Coykendall 2007, Camara & Vadopalas 2009).
It is unclear why hypotheses of Lepomis relationships show such inconsistencies but possible reasons include rapid historical diversification, inadequate analyses of phylogenetic data, inadequate markers or taxon sampling, genetic introgression via historical and recent hybridization, or cryptic diversity (Near et al.
Differences in extent of genetic introgression between sympatric Culex pipiens and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) in California and South Africa).
The spread of the Leu-Phe kdr mutation through Anopheles gambiae complex in Burkina Faso: genetic introgression and de novo phenomena.
Because no other pig's control region haplotype except Tunchang pig of Hainan Island was identical to the Taoyuan pig, or Lower Changjiang River Basin and Central China Type breeds, these data suggest that the control region haplotype of Tunchang pig originated in the Lower Changjiang River Basin and Central China Type pig breeds via genetic introgression.
14% at Chapman's Landing, New Hampshire and 19% at Parker River NWR, Massachusetts) indicated genetic introgression may exceed morphological variation (Rhymer and Simberloff 1996, Sattler and Braun 2000, Bronson et al.
However, additional studies are needed to determine whether distinct phenotypes are maintained possibly under genetic introgression between the 2 subspecies, or if phenotypes are maintained because introgression is limited or perhaps absent.