heredity

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he·red·i·ty

 (hə-rĕd′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. he·red·i·ties
1. The genetic transmission of characteristics from parent to offspring.
2. The sum of characteristics and associated potentialities transmitted genetically to an individual organism.

[French hérédité, from Old French heredite, inheritance, from Latin hērēditās, from hērēs, hērēd-, heir; see ghē- in Indo-European roots.]

heredity

(hɪˈrɛdɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Biology) the transmission from one generation to another of genetic factors that determine individual characteristics: responsible for the resemblances between parents and offspring
2. (Biology) the sum total of the inherited factors or their characteristics in an organism
[C16: from Old French heredite, from Latin hērēditās inheritance; see heir]

he•red•i•ty

(həˈrɛd ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the passing on of characters or traits from parents to offspring as a result of the transmission of genes.
2. the genetic characters so transmitted.
3. the characteristics of an individual that are considered to have been passed on by the parents or ancestors.
[1530–40; < Middle French heredite < Latin hērēditās inheritance =hērēd-, s. of hērēs heir + -itās -ity]

he·red·i·ty

(hə-rĕd′ĭ-tē)
The passage of biological traits or characteristics from parents to offspring through the inheritance of genes.

Heredity


generation of living organisms from inanimate matter. Also called spontaneous generation.
the congenital absence of the brain and spinal cord in a devel-oping fetus.
the science or study of biotypes, or organisms sharing the same hereditary characteristics — biotypologic, biotypological, adj.
the theory that hereditary characteristics are transmitted by germ plasm. Cf. pangenesis. — blastogenetic, adj.
the entire substance of a cell excluding the nucleus.
the complex substance that is the main carrier of genetic information for all organisms and a major component of chromosomes.
deoxyribonucleic acid.
lack of or partial fertility, as found in hybrids like the mule, which cannot breed amongst themselves but only with the parent stock. — dysgenetic, adj.
alternation of generations. — geneagenetic, adj.
1. Biology. the science of heredity, studying resemblances and differences in related organisms and the mechanisms which explain these phenomena.
2. the genetic properties and phenomena of an organism. — geneticist, n. — genetic, adj.
a believer in the theory that heredity, more than environment, determines nature, characteristics, etc.
the normal course of generation in which the offspring resembles the parent from generation to generation. — homogenetic, adj,
the laws of inheritance through genes, discovered by Gregor J. Mendel. — Mendelian. n., adj.
the theory advanced by Darwin, now rejected, that transmission of traits is caused by every cell’s throwing off particles called gemmules, which are the basic units of hereditary transmission. The gemmules were said to have collected in the reproductive cells, thus ensuring that each cell is represented in the germ cells. Cf. blastogenesis. — pangenetic, adj.
Haeckel’s theory of generation and reproduction, which assumes that a dynamic growth force is passed on from one generation to the next. — perigenetic, adj.
the capacity of one parent to impose its hereditary characteristics on offspring by virtue of its possessing a larger number of homozygous, dominant genes than the other parent. — prepotent, adj.
a division of radiobiology that studies the effects of radioactiv-ity upon factors of inheritance in genetics. — radiogenic, adj.
a DNA molecule in which the genetic material has been artificially broken down so that genes from another organism can be intro-duced and the molecule then recombined, the result being alterations in the genetic characteristics of the original molecule.
a nucleic acid found in cells that transmits genetic instructions from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.
ribonucleic acid.
the supposed transmission of hereditary characteristics from one sire to offspring subsequently born to other sires by the same female. — telegonic, adj.
the theories of development and heredity asserted by August Weismann (1834-1914), esp. that inheritable characteristics are carried in the germ cells, and that acquired characteristics are not hereditary. — Weismannian, n., adj.
1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. Also xenogeny. — xenogenic, xenogenetic, adj.
xenogenesis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heredity - the biological process whereby genetic factors are transmitted from one generation to the nextheredity - the biological process whereby genetic factors are transmitted from one generation to the next
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
2.heredity - the total of inherited attributes
property - a basic or essential attribute shared by all members of a class; "a study of the physical properties of atomic particles"
hereditary pattern, inheritance - (genetics) attributes acquired via biological heredity from the parents

heredity

noun genetics, inheritance, genetic make-up, congenital traits Heredity is not a factor in causing the cancer.
Translations
dědičnost
arvarvelighed
átöröklés
ættgengi, erfî
paveldimaspaveldimumas
iedzimtība
dedičnosť
irsiyetkalıtımsoya çekim

heredity

[hɪˈredɪtɪ] Nherencia f

heredity

[hɪˈrɛdɪti] nhérédité f

heredity

nVererbung f; the title is his by heredityer hat den Titel geerbt/wird den Titel erben

heredity

[hɪˈrɛdɪtɪ] neredità

heredity

(həˈredəti) noun
the passing on of qualities (eg appearance, intelligence) from parents to children.
heˈreditary adjective
(able to be) passed on in this way. Is musical ability hereditary?

he·red·i·ty

n. herencia, trasmisión de características o rasgos genéticos de padres a hijos.

heredity

n herencia
References in periodicals archive ?
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He's an incredible example of a nurse shark in his prime and is actually part of an international stud group that ensures genetic lines are diverse, which helps give the species the best possible chance of survival in the wild.
Art's Way Scientific recently signed contracts for an additional $290,000 in business, including a swine research unit for Recombinetics, a company that develops genetic lines of swine bred to duplicate human diseases like heart disease, diabetes and cancer.
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Serum concentrations of leptin in six genetic lines of swine and relationship with growth and carcass characteristics.
They have been added to over the years, with the city now boasting more than 3,000 of the trees, from more than a dozen genetic lines.
Field-based, high-throughput phenotyping using only manual labor is prohibitive because thousands of distinct genetic lines must be characterized.
Right now, it takes 5 years to select candidates, grow them out, cross with other genetic lines, develop and evaluate new types, and then get seed production," Casler says.
Because Mark had been crossing genetics on soybeans since the age of 12, he also implemented a research division to develop new lines of his own genetic lines for production.
It is a magnificent herd with top genetics and this sale provides a real opportunity for people to buy into some excellent genetic lines.
With most breeds established for many years now, breeders are working to breed these particular disease-causing genes out of their genetic lines, hoping to produce dogs with all the good attributes and few of the bad.