genetic engineering

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genetic engineering

n.
Scientific alteration of the structure of genetic material in a living organism. It involves the production and use of recombinant DNA and has been employed to create bacteria that synthesize insulin and other human proteins.

genetic engineer n.

genetic engineering

n
(Genetics) alteration of the DNA of a cell for purposes of research, as a means of manufacturing animal proteins, correcting genetic defects, or making improvements to plants and animals bred by humans

genet′ic engineer′ing


n.
1. the development and application of scientific procedures and technologies that permit direct manipulation of genetic material in order to alter the hereditary traits of a cell, organism, or population.
2. a technique producing unlimited amounts of otherwise unavailable or scarce biological products by introducing DNA from living organisms into bacteria and then harvesting the product, as human insulin produced in bacteria by the human insulin gene. Also called biogenetics.
[1965–70]
genet′ic engineer′, n.

genetic engineering

The science of altering and cloning genes to produce a new trait in an organism or to make a biological substance, such as a protein or hormone. Genetic engineering mainly involves the creation of recombinant DNA, which is then inserted into the genetic material of a cell or virus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genetic engineering - the technology of preparing recombinant DNA in vitro by cutting up DNA molecules and splicing together fragments from more than one organism
biotech, biotechnology - the branch of molecular biology that studies the use of microorganisms to perform specific industrial processes; "biotechnology produced genetically altered bacteria that solved the problem"
Translations
هَنْدّسَه وراثِيَّه
genetické inženýrství
genteknik
génsebészetgéntechnológia
genetické inžinierstvo
genetik mühendisliği

genetic engineering

ningegneria genetica

gene

(dʒiːn) noun
any of the basic elements of heredity, passed from parents to their offspring. If the children are red-haired, one of their parents must have a gene for red hair.
genetic (dʒəˈnetik) adjective
of genes or genetics. a genetic abnormality.
genetic engineering noun
the science of changing the genetic features of animals and plants.
genetics (dʒəˈnetiks) noun singular
the science of heredity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some day, we may be looking at a world where genetic manipulation is as widespread and common place as it was in the dystopian movie GATTACA-let's just hope that the real-life consequences aren't as severe as the fictional ones.
He says the finding opens up a route to extreme radioactive resistance by supplementation alone--no genetic manipulation required.
Genetic manipulation and human cloning are possible, write bioengineers Kyle Kurpinski and Terry Johnson in How to Defeat Your Own Clone.
These issues include: the consent of cell donors and subject of property rights in the field of tissue engineering and enhancement of human capabilities for longevity; cloning of animals and humans (potentially) in the future; genetic manipulation for diagnosis and treatment of diseases; use of stem cells and gene therapy for treatment of human diseases; genetic manipulation of plants to produce therapeutic drugs and food for people and many other related issues.
In addition, shortly before the Beijing Games in 2008, a German investigative television team broadcast a program identifying a Chinese scientist who was reported to be offering genetic manipulation for athletes.
They then used genetic manipulation to block expression of the FGFR4 gene in human RMS cells.
According to the Guardian, The Turing Test comprises 14 stories, which feature subjects such as alien planets, genetic manipulation and robots.
A fluorescent dog may be easy to find on a night-time walk, but this quirk is used to prove the genetic manipulation has worked, meaning they are now much more useful candidates for human medical research.
Although those polled are generally positive about research in the medico-pharmaceutical field and research on solutions to energy, environment and climate problems, they are "concerned" about genetic manipulation, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and more generally the use of science for destructive purposes, such as nuclear and chemical armaments.
A solution might lie in a single vaccine for all 24 strains or in a specific genetic manipulation of the type of midge scientists believe carry the virus.
These include pollution, drugs, genetic manipulation, social and economic injustice and Nacho Novo's tackle against Hibs' Thierry Gathuessi.
Others include genetic manipulation and social and economic injustice.