geneva

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Ge·ne·va

 (jə-nē′və)
A city of southwest Switzerland located on Lake Geneva and bisected by the Rhone River. Originally an ancient Celtic settlement, it was a focal point of the Reformation after the arrival of John Calvin in 1536. Geneva was the headquarters of the League of Nations (1920-1946) and is still the site of many international organizations.

Geneva

(dʒɪˈniːvə)
n
1. (Placename) a city in SW Switzerland, in the Rhône valley on Lake Geneva: centre of Calvinism; headquarters of the International Red Cross (1864), the International Labour Office (1925), the League of Nations (1929–46), the World Health Organization, and the European office of the United Nations; banking centre. Pop: 177 500 (2002 est)
2. (Placename) a canton in SW Switzerland. Capital: Geneva. Pop: 419 300 (2002 est). Area: 282 sq km (109 sq miles). French name: Genève German name: Genf
3. (Placename) Lake Geneva a lake between SW Switzerland and E France: fed and drained by the River Rhône, it is the largest of the Alpine lakes; the surface is subject to considerable changes of level. Area: 580 sq km (224 sq miles). French name: Lac Léman German name: Genfersee

ge•ne•va

(dʒəˈni və)

n.
[1700–10; < Dutch genever < Old French genevre < Latin jūniperus juniper]

Ge•ne•va

(dʒəˈni və)

n.
1. the capital of the canton of Geneva, in SW Switzerland, on the Lake of Geneva: seat of the League of Nations 1920–46. 167,697.
2. a canton in SW Switzerland. 395,466; 109 sq. mi. (282 sq. km).
3. Lake of. Also called Lake Leman. a lake between SW Switzerland and France. 45 mi. (72 km) long; 225 sq. mi. (583 sq. km).
French, Genève (for defs. 1,2). German, Genf (for defs. 1,2).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geneva - a city in southwestern Switzerland at the western end of Lake GenevaGeneva - a city in southwestern Switzerland at the western end of Lake Geneva; it is the headquarters of various international organizations
Schweiz, Suisse, Svizzera, Swiss Confederation, Switzerland - a landlocked federal republic in central Europe
Genevan - a native or resident of Geneva
2.geneva - gin made in the Netherlands
gin - strong liquor flavored with juniper berries
Translations
Ženeva
Geneve
GenfGenfersee
Genève
Genf
GeneveGenevejärviGeneven kantoni
Genf
Ženeva
Genève

Geneva

[dʒɪˈniːvə] NGinebra
the Geneva Conventionla convención de Ginebra

Geneva

[dʒɪˈniːvə] nGenève
in Geneva → à Genève
to Geneva → à Genève
Lake Geneva → le lac Léman

Geneva

nGenf nt; Lake Genevader Genfer See

Geneva

[dʒɪˈniːvə] nGinevra
Lake Geneva → il lago di Ginevra
References in periodicals archive ?
The scientists were led by Paul Genever in the Arthritis Research U.
EBLEX livestock scientist Dr Liz Genever, said: "Understanding the soil on your farm is fundamental to profitable grassland farming.
Read it TAKING its first appearance in the Oxford English Dictionary in 1714 as her starting point (when Dutch genever arrived and was rebirthed in Georgian England), in Gin Glorious Gin: How Mother's Ruin Became The Spirit Of London (Headline, PS14.
Drink: Captain Planet, made with Bols Genever, spiced watermelon and strawberry shrub; Shandy Koufax, made with rum, Amaro Meletti, pineapple gomme, California IPA and Angostura
to 2008--when Genever got its own AOC, now reserved for Belgium, Netherlands, and parts of France and Germany--you'll understand why it's no longer "Dutch Gin.
The initial challenge is to create an iconic drink using Bols liqueurs, Bols Genever or both, followed by an exam on the fundamentals of bartending and a short video presenting the cocktail entry in the second and third heats.
Straight genever, local beer and an occasional glass of wine are the preferred quaffs here, accompanied by classic American jazz.
Paul Genever of the University of York is growing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)--currently one of the leading candidates to be used in stem cell therapies--as tiny spheres.
Fiddleback Construction owner Christopher Genever states, "I knew I needed more ways to connect with my customers online, so I hired Prospect Genius to make it easier for them to find me and learn about my services.
The Dutch took to it in a big way, calling it Genever, and it spread to England, reaching its dubious heyday after King William went to war with the French, banned brandy and spawned the Hogarthian "Gin Lane" epidemic, with the whole of London's urban poor apparently staggering about drunk on an almighty bender fuelled by cheap sweetened gin known as Old Tom.
He called it jenever or genever, after the French world for juniper, genievre.