Genys

Ge´nys

    (jē´nĭs)
n.1.(Zool.) See Gonys.
References in periodicals archive ?
96), it has, however, remained undiscussed within the archaeological texts (Zulkus & Genys 1984; Genys 1989).
From all the vessel tiles of the museum's collection that have been analysed, only the most characteristic finds were selected for this research (Zulkus 1976; 1978; 1980; 1999; Genys 1981; Sprainaitis 1985; 1986; 1990; 1992; 1994; 1995; 1996).
This age group--often referred to as GenYs or Millennials--has arrived in the workplace with a clear deficit in two critical areas: (1) accepting feedback and constructive criticism, and (2) accepting responsibility for mistakes.
GenYs were born between 1980 and 2000 and they are today's 22-32 year old university graduates working in corporate and government offices.
8220;After 20+ years of presenting performing arts services in a variety of rented venues throughout the Gilbert and Mesa, it is with great joy we announce our first season in our new home, the ClearView Cultural Center,” says founder, Nancy Genys.
Credit unions are making this very easy to do on mobile, which can attract particularly the GenYs and millennials where big banks have significant inroads and who, demographically, might be most impacted by fees," Kilmer said.
30 /PRNewswire/ -- The "most important election of our lifetime" is expected to draw more GenYs to the voting booths in November than in any previous U.
Genys, Blazing a Trail in the "New Frontier" of the CISG: Helen Kaminski Pty.
Honnold, supra note 45, at 103 (asserting that if orders are later made and accepted, the "framework" agreement can supply transactional details to supplement the provisions of the CISG); see also Genys, supra note 231, at 435.
Hubley and Genys (1998) remarked that despite Congress' clear directive that charter schools must be in full compliance with Part B of the IDEA, there has been "no comprehensive effort to date to explore how charter school statutes and federal disability law fit together" (p.