geography

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ge·og·ra·phy

 (jē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. ge·og·ra·phies
1. The study of the earth and its features and of the distribution of life on the earth, including human life and the effects of human activity.
2. The physical characteristics, especially the surface features, of an area.
3. A book on geography.
4. An ordered arrangement of constituent elements: charting a geography of the mind.

[Latin geōgraphia, from Greek geōgraphiā : geō-, geo- + -graphiā, -graphy.]

ge·og′ra·pher n.

geography

(dʒɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n, pl -phies
1. (Physical Geography) the study of the natural features of the earth's surface, including topography, climate, soil, vegetation, etc, and man's response to them
2. (Physical Geography) the natural features of a region
3. an arrangement of constituent parts; plan; layout
geˈographer n
geographical, ˌgeoˈgraphic adj
ˌgeoˈgraphically adv

ge•og•ra•phy

(dʒiˈɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. the science dealing with the areal differentiation of the earth's surface, as shown in the character, arrangement, and interrelations of such elements as climate, elevation, vegetation, population, and land use.
2. the topographical features of a given region.
3. a book dealing with geographical science or study, as a textbook.
4. the arrangement of features of any complex entity: the geography of the mind.
[1535–45; < Latin geōgraphia < Greek geōgraphía earth description. See geo-, -graphy]

ge·og·ra·phy

(jē-ŏg′rə-fē)
The scientific study of the Earth's surface and its various climates, countries, peoples, and natural resources.

Geography

See also earth; equator; land; maps.

the scientific study of man’s geographical distribution and his relationship with his environment.
the complement of latitude; the difference between any given latitude and 90°.
1. a book of place names, sometimes with additional information, arranged alphabetically.
2. an index to an atlas.
1. the science that studies and describes the surface of the earth and its physical, biological, political, economie, and demographic characteristics and the complex interrelations among them.
2. the topographical features of a specific area.
3. a book on this subject. — geographer, n.geographic, geographical, adj.
the study of the characteristics, origins, and development of land forms. — geomorphologist, n.geomorphologic, geomorphological, adj.
1. the study or application of the effect of political or economic geography on the political structure, programs, or philosophy of a state.
2. a policy or policies based on such factors.
3. the complex of geographical and political factors affecting or determining the nature of a state or region.
4. the study of the relationship between geography and politics, applied especially to the study of the doctrines and actions of Nazi Germany in the context of world domination. — geopolitician, n.geopolitical, adj.
the branch of geography that studies land areas above sea level to measure and map them. — hypsographic, hypsographical, adj.
the science or study of islands. — islandologist, n.
a rhumb line or curve on the surface of a sphere intersecting all meridians at the same angle; hence, the course of a ship or aircraft following a constant compass direction. — loxodromic, adj.
an instrument for determining longitude by observation of the stars.
1. a great circle that passes through the earth’s poles and any other given point on the earth’s surface.
2. half of such a circle.
3. any line of longitude running north and south on a map. See also astronomy. — meridian, meridional, adj.
the branch of physical geography that studies mountains and mountain systems. — orographic, orographical, adj.
the branch of geography that studies the features of the earth of past geologie times. — paleogeographer, palaeogeographer, n.paleogeographic, palaeogeographic, paleogeographical, palaeogeographical, adj.
1. physical geography.
2. geomorphology. See also classification. — physiographer, n.physiographic, physiographical, adj.
a branch of physical geography that studies wet lands, as marshes or swamps.
the study of geographical variation and distribution of temperature. — thermogeographical, adj.
1. the art or technique of preparing charts or maps of a specified area.
2. the physical features of an area. — topographic, topographical, adj.
the study of the physical features of a specific place or area, usually accompanied by maps or charts showing relationships and elevations. — topologist, n.topologic, topological, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geography - study of the earth's surfacegeography - study of the earth's surface; includes people's responses to topography and climate and soil and vegetation
earth science - any of the sciences that deal with the earth or its parts
physical geography, physiography - the study of physical features of the earth's surface
topography - precise detailed study of the surface features of a region
economic geography - the branch of geography concerned with the production and distribution of commodities

geography

noun

Geography

Branches of geography  biogeography, cartography, chorography, chorology, climatology, demography, geology, geomorphology, glaciology, hydrology, human geography, meteorology, oceanography, oceanology, orography or orology, pedology, physical geography, political geography or geopolitics, seismology, topography, vulcanology
Geography terms and features  afforestation, antipodes, arête, atlas, atmosphere, atoll, basin, bay, beach, canyon, cliff, climate, col, conservation, continent, continental drift, continental shelf, contour, conurbation, coombe, coral reef, core, corrie, cirque, or cwm, crag, crater, crevasse, crust, culvert, deforestation, delta, desert, desertification, dormitory, dyke, earthquake, eastings, environment, epicentre, equator, erosion, escarpment, estuary, fault, fell, fjord, flood plain, glaciation, glacier, glade, glen, global warming, green belt, greenhouse effect, grid reference, hanging valley, headland, ice cap, infrastructure, International Date Line, irrigation, isobar, isobath, isohyet, isotherm, isthmus, jungle, lagoon, latitude, levée, loch, longitude, longshore drift, mantle, map, meander, Mercator projection, moraine, new town, northern hemisphere, northings, North Pole, occidental, ocean, Ordnance Survey, oriental, ozone layer, permafrost, plate tectonics, pollution, precipitation, rainforest, rain shadow, reef, relief map, ridge, rift valley, rill, river basin, rivulet, salt flat, salt lake, sandbank, sand bar, sand dune, savanna or savannah, scree, sierra, snow line, southern hemisphere, South Pole, spit, spring, spur, stack, steppe, subsoil, suburb, tarn, temperate, Third World, topsoil, tor, tropics, tsunami, tundra, urbanization, veld or veldt, volcano, wadi, watercourse, water cycle, waterfall, watershed, water table, weathering, wetland, whirlpool
Geographers  Richard Hakluyt (English), Sir Halford John Mackinder (British), Gerardus Mercator (Gerhard Kremer) (Flemish), Pausanias (Greek), Ptolemy (Greek), Mary Somerville (British), Strabo (Greek)
Translations
geografie
جُغْرافياجُغْرَافيا
география
geografiezeměpis
geografi
geografio
maantiedemaantieto
zemljopisgeografija
földrajz
geografi
landafræðilandafræîi
地理学
지리학
geographia
geografijageografinisgeografiškaigeografas
ģeogrāfija
geografie
zemepis
geografijazemljepis
geografi
jiografia
ภูมิศาสตร์
географія
địa lý

geography

[dʒɪˈɒgrəfɪ] Ngeografía f
policemen who knew the local geographypolicías que conocían bien el lugar

geography

[dʒiˈɒgrəfi] ngéographie f
to know the local geography (= locality) → bien connaître les environs

geography

nGeografie f; (Sch also) → Erdkunde f; policemen who knew the local geographyPolizisten, die sich vor Ort auskannten

geography

[dʒɪˈɒgrəfɪ] ngeografia

geography

(dʒiˈogrəfi) noun
the science that describes the surface of the Earth and its inhabitants. He is studying geography.
geˈographer noun
a person who studies geography.
geographic(al) (dʒiəˈgrӕfik(əl)) adjective
a geographical study of the area.
ˌgeoˈgraphically adverb

geography

جُغْرَافيا geografie geografi Geographie γεωγραφία geografía maantiede géographie zemljopis geografia 地理学 지리학 geografie geografi geografia geografia география geografi ภูมิศาสตร์ coğrafya địa lý 地理学
References in classic literature ?
The whole extent of this prince's dominions reaches about six thousand miles in length, and from three to five in breadth: whence I cannot but conclude, that our geographers of Europe are in a great error, by supposing nothing but sea between Japan and California; for it was ever my opinion, that there must be a balance of earth to counterpoise the great continent of Tartary; and therefore they ought to correct their maps and charts, by joining this vast tract of land to the north-west parts of America, wherein I shall be ready to lend them my assistance.
also very far from it; for Loewestein, as the geographers tell us, is situated at the point of the islet which is formed by the confluence of the Waal and the Meuse, opposite Gorcum.
dispute among geographers as to whether it is a continent or an
3] The Cerographic Atlas of the United States (1842-1845), by Sidney Edwards Morse (1794-1871), son of the geographer, Jedidiah Morse, and brother of the painter-inventor, Samuel F.
The geographer Guyot, himself a European, goes farther--farther than I am ready to follow him; yet not when he says: "As the plant is made for the animal, as the vegetable world is made for the animal world, America is made for the man of the Old World.
We have seen the Campanile, and Byron's house and Balbi's the geographer, and the palaces of all the ancient dukes and doges of Venice, and we have seen their effeminate descendants airing their nobility in fashionable French attire in the Grand Square of St.
The geographer Balbi has well remarked, that an encircled island is an atoll with high land rising out of its lagoon; remove the land from within, and a perfect atoll is left.
Ibn Hankal, the Arabian geographer, describes a heroic extreme in the hospitality of Sogd, in Bukharia.
Ancient books and documents all show that the Persian Gulf or (Sinous Persicous) has always been an inalienable part of Persia (modern day Iran) and display how many world topographers and geographers have underlined the Iranian identity of the waterway.
With that in mind, and recognising the importance of the next generation of geographers, Bangor University held a 6th form Geography conference recently.
Geographers say the disappearing ice is "one of the most striking" changes in the history of the National Geographic Atlas of the World.
It was in recognition of their tireless efforts and of the development of partnerships with Arts Council England (ACE) and the Royal Geographical Society-Institute of British Geographers.