geopolitics

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ge·o·pol·i·tics

 (jē′ō-pŏl′ĭ-tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
1. The study of the relationship among politics and geography, demography, and economics, especially with respect to the foreign policy of a nation.
2.
a. A governmental policy employing geopolitics.
b. A Nazi doctrine holding that the geographic, economic, and political needs of Germany justified its invasion and seizure of other lands.
3. A combination of geographic and political factors relating to or influencing a nation or region.

ge′o·po·lit′i·cal (-pə-lĭt′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ge′o·po·lit′i·cal·ly adv.
ge′o·pol′i·ti′cian (-tĭsh′ən) n.

geopolitics

(ˌdʒiːəʊˈpɒlɪtɪks)
n
1. (Physical Geography) (functioning as singular) the study of the effect of geographical factors on politics, esp international politics; political geography
2. (Physical Geography) (functioning as plural) the combination of geographical and political factors affecting a country or area
3. (Physical Geography) (functioning as plural) politics as they affect the whole world; global politics
ˌgeoˌpoliˈtician n

ge•o•pol•i•tics

(ˌdʒi oʊˈpɒl ɪ tɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
1. the study of the influence of physical geography on the politics, national power, or foreign policy of a state.
2. the combination of geographic and political factors influencing or delineating a country or region.
3. a national policy based on the interrelation of politics and geography.
[1900–05; translation of German Geopolitik]
ge`o•po•lit′i•cal (-pəˈlɪt ɪ kəl) adj.

geopolitics

1. the study or application of the effect of political or economic geography on the political structure, programs, or philosophy of a state.
2. a policy or policies based on such factors.
3. the complex of geographical and political factors affecting or determining the nature of a state or region.
4. the study of the relationship between geography and politics, applied especially to the study of the doctrines and actions of Nazi Germany in the context of world domination. — geopolitician, n.geopolitical, adj.
See also: Politics
1. the study or application of the effect of political or economic geography on the political structure, programs, or philosophy of a state.
2. a policy or policies based on such factors.
3. the complex of geographical and political factors affecting or determining the nature of a state or region.
4. the study of the relationship between geography and politics, applied especially to the study of the doctrines and actions of Nazi Germany in the context of world domination. — geopolitician, n.geopolitical, adj.
See also: Geography
the study of the relationship between geography and politics, applied especially to the study of the doctrines and actions of Nazi Germany in the context of world domination.
See also: Germany

geopolitics

The study of the ways in which geography and politics interact, especially in international affairs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geopolitics - the study of the effects of economic geography on the powers of the state
political science, politics, government - the study of government of states and other political units
geostrategy - the branch of geopolitics dealing with strategy
Translations

geopolitics

[ˈdʒiːəʊˈpɒlɪtɪks] NSINGgeopolítica f

geopolitics

[ˌdʒiːəʊˈpɒlɪtɪks] ngéopolitique f

geopolitics

n singGeopolitik f

geopolitics

[ˌdʒiːəʊˈpɒlɪtɪks] ngeopolitica
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Olson, "The Kurdish Question and Geopolitic and Geostrategic Changes in the Middle East alter the Gulf War," Journal of South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, 17 (4) 1994, p.
Incorporation, to recall the term Thoreau uses and the point he makes in his description of Enfield, does not necessarily mean that a territory has become a fully functioning organ of the body geopolitic (please excuse the neologism).
The problem with NATO acting in Yugoslavia as an agent of `militaristic humanism' or even `militaristic pacifism' (Ulrich Beck) is not that this term is an Orwellian oxymoron (reminding us of `Peace is War' slogans from his 1984); neither is it that, obviously, the targets of bombardment are not chosen out of pure moral consideration, but selectively, depending on unadmitted geopolitic and economic strategic interests (the obvious Marxist-style criticism).
The Tailor of Panama by John le Carre (Knopf, $25) Fans of le Carre will be fascinated to meet his most improbable spy, Harry Pendel, and witness the geopolitic web he weaves in Panama City.
36-44; "The Kurdish Question and the Kurdish Problem: Some Geopolitic and Geostrategic Comparisons," Peuples Mediterraneens no.