geopolitics

(redirected from Geopolitical system)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ge·o·pol·i·tics

 (jē′ō-pŏl′ĭ-tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
1. The study of the relationship among politics and geography, demography, and economics, especially with respect to the foreign policy of a nation.
2.
a. A governmental policy employing geopolitics.
b. A Nazi doctrine holding that the geographic, economic, and political needs of Germany justified its invasion and seizure of other lands.
3. A combination of geographic and political factors relating to or influencing a nation or region.

ge′o·po·lit′i·cal (-pə-lĭt′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ge′o·po·lit′i·cal·ly adv.
ge′o·pol′i·ti′cian (-tĭsh′ən) n.

geopolitics

(ˌdʒiːəʊˈpɒlɪtɪks)
n
1. (Physical Geography) (functioning as singular) the study of the effect of geographical factors on politics, esp international politics; political geography
2. (Physical Geography) (functioning as plural) the combination of geographical and political factors affecting a country or area
3. (Physical Geography) (functioning as plural) politics as they affect the whole world; global politics
ˌgeoˌpoliˈtician n

ge•o•pol•i•tics

(ˌdʒi oʊˈpɒl ɪ tɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
1. the study of the influence of physical geography on the politics, national power, or foreign policy of a state.
2. the combination of geographic and political factors influencing or delineating a country or region.
3. a national policy based on the interrelation of politics and geography.
[1900–05; translation of German Geopolitik]
ge`o•po•lit′i•cal (-pəˈlɪt ɪ kəl) adj.

geopolitics

1. the study or application of the effect of political or economic geography on the political structure, programs, or philosophy of a state.
2. a policy or policies based on such factors.
3. the complex of geographical and political factors affecting or determining the nature of a state or region.
4. the study of the relationship between geography and politics, applied especially to the study of the doctrines and actions of Nazi Germany in the context of world domination. — geopolitician, n.geopolitical, adj.
See also: Politics
1. the study or application of the effect of political or economic geography on the political structure, programs, or philosophy of a state.
2. a policy or policies based on such factors.
3. the complex of geographical and political factors affecting or determining the nature of a state or region.
4. the study of the relationship between geography and politics, applied especially to the study of the doctrines and actions of Nazi Germany in the context of world domination. — geopolitician, n.geopolitical, adj.
See also: Geography
the study of the relationship between geography and politics, applied especially to the study of the doctrines and actions of Nazi Germany in the context of world domination.
See also: Germany

geopolitics

The study of the ways in which geography and politics interact, especially in international affairs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geopolitics - the study of the effects of economic geography on the powers of the state
political science, politics, government - the study of government of states and other political units
geostrategy - the branch of geopolitics dealing with strategy
Translations

geopolitics

[ˈdʒiːəʊˈpɒlɪtɪks] NSINGgeopolítica f

geopolitics

[ˌdʒiːəʊˈpɒlɪtɪks] ngéopolitique f

geopolitics

n singGeopolitik f

geopolitics

[ˌdʒiːəʊˈpɒlɪtɪks] ngeopolitica
References in periodicals archive ?
If Kyrgyzstan joins the Customs Union, it will become very attractive for Russian investment, Belorussian expert Yury Shevtsov said on November 21 at a round table discussion "Kyrgyzstan in geopolitical system of Eurasia: economy, politics, history".
The new steam technologies of the Industrial Revolution would never have had the effect that they did if they had not operated within the context of a stable geopolitical system within which the Royal Navy guaranteed the freedom of the seas for all; within which wars between the major European powers were relatively rare; and within which those same European powers used their military superiority to impose more or less open trade on most of Africa and Asia.
In other words, as an existing geopolitical system was on the verge of splitting apart, the sf genre became particularly interested in tracking the spatial relationships among economically and politically affiliated, but also potentially hostile, planets.