Crabbe

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Crabbe

 (krăb), George 1754-1832.
British poet noted for his simple, realistic poems of rural life, including The Village (1783).

Crabbe

(kræb)
n
(Biography) George. 1754–1832, English narrative poet, noted for his depiction of impoverished rural life in The Village (1783) and The Borough (1810)
References in classic literature ?
Footnote: For the sake of brevity the sternly realistic poet George Crabbe is here omitted.
As indicated above, the examples White examines in the course of this book are generally well chosen and it is especially gratifying to see due attention being paid to unjustly neglected figures such as George Crabbe and Ebenezer Elliott, who might not normally get a chapter to themselves.
With this opera, Britten took inspiration from a poem called The Borough by George Crabbe.
In California and feeling homesick, Britten read an article about the obscure Suffolk poet George Crabbe, who came from the same sea faring community as Britten and whose poem 'The Borough' became the unlikely source for what became the defining opera of English culture.
READERS TODAY HAVE ALL BUT FORGOTTEN THAT THE POETRY OF GEORGE Crabbe was once central in the most important debates shaping British literature.
Snow referred to them, to examine the mystery of an unpublished work by English poet George Crabbe.
The Literary Economy of Jane Austen and George Crabbe.
Aleksandr Vasil'evic Druzinin (1824-64), a prominent writer, critic, and specialist in English literature, introduced George Crabbe (1754-1832) to Russia in the 1850s with his critical biography of the English poet.
But CND member George Crabbe, of Cowbridge, said the United Nations - not NATO - should carry out any action.
Britten was still in wartime exile in America when he came across a story by his fellow East Anglian, George Crabbe, about a fisherman driven to suicide over the mistreatment of his apprentice.
It was George Crabbe, in Smugglers and Poachers, who came up with the observation, "Love warps the mind a little from the right.
And some of his observations retain their aptness, as when he admonishes Comte in proofreading his work to "strike your pen through the majority or [sic] the adverbs & epithets and remove without scruple all those sentences of anticipation & retrospection which are practically of no use whatever & which swell the already long sentences" (1: 143), or when he writes to the Reverend George Crabbe, son of the poet: