George

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George

 (jôrj)
n.
1. A jeweled figure of Saint George killing the dragon, used as an insignia of the Order of the Garter.
2. An English coin during the reign of Henry VIII, imprinted with a figure of Saint George.

George

, Saint Died c. ad 303.
Christian martyr and patron of England who, according to legend, slew a fearsome dragon.

George

(dʒɔːdʒ)
n
1. (Biography) David Lloyd. See Lloyd George
2. (Biography) Sir Edward (Alan John), known as Eddie. 1938–2009, British economist, governor of the Bank of England (1993–2003)
3. (Biography) Henry. 1839–97, US economist: advocated a single tax on land values, esp in Progress and Poverty (1879)
4. (Biography) Saint. died ?303 ad, Christian martyr, the patron saint of England; the hero of a legend in which he slew a dragon. Feast day: April 23
5. (Biography) Stefan (Anton) (ˈʃtɛfan). 1868–1933, German poet and aesthete. Influenced by the French Symbolists, esp Mallarmé and later by Nietzsche, he sought for an idealized purity of form in his verse. He refused Nazi honours and went into exile in 1933

George

(dʒɔːdʒ)
n
(Aeronautics) informal Brit the automatic pilot in an aircraft
[C20: originally a slang name for an airman]

George

(dʒɔrdʒ)

n. Idioms:
by George! Chiefly Brit. Informal. (an exclamation used to express astonishment, approval, etc.)
[1595–1600]

George

(dʒɔrdʒ)

n.
1. David Lloyd, Lloyd George, David.
2. Henry, 1839–97, U.S. economist.
3. Saint, died A.D. 303?, Christian martyr: patron saint of England.
4. Ste•fan An•ton (ˈʃtɛ fɑn ˈɑn toʊn) 1868–1933, German poet.
5. Lake, a lake in E New York. 36 mi. (58 km) long.

George

(dʒɔrdʒ)
n.
1. George I, 1660–1727, king of England 1714–27.
2. George II, 1683–1760, king of England 1727–60 (son of George I).
3. George III, 1738–1820, king of England 1760–1820 (grandson of George II).
4. George IV, 1762–1830, king of England 1820–30 (son of George III).
5. George V, 1865–1936, king of England 1910–36 (son of Edward VII).
6. George VI, 1895–1952, king of England 1936–1952 (son of George V).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.George - Christian martyrGeorge - Christian martyr; patron saint of England; hero of the legend of Saint George and the Dragon in which he slew a dragon and saved a princess (?-303)
2.George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and emperor of India from 1936 to 1947George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and emperor of India from 1936 to 1947; he succeeded Edward VIII (1895-1952)
House of Windsor, Windsor - the British royal family since 1917
3.George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and emperor of India from 1910 to 1936George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and emperor of India from 1910 to 1936; gave up his German title in 1917 during World War I (1865-1936)
Saxe-Coburg-Gotha - the name of the royal family that ruled Great Britain from 1901-1917; the name was changed to Windsor in 1917 in response to anti-German feelings in World War I
House of Windsor, Windsor - the British royal family since 1917
4.George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 1820 to 1830George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 1820 to 1830; his attempt to divorce his estranged wife undermined the prestige of the Crown (1762-1830)
Hanoverian line, House of Hanover, Hanover - the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)
5.George - King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 to 1820George - King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 to 1820; the American colonies were lost during his reign; he became insane in 1811 and his son (later George IV) acted as regent until 1820 (1738-1820)
Hanoverian line, House of Hanover, Hanover - the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)
6.George - King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover from 1727 to 1760 (1683-1760)George - King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover from 1727 to 1760 (1683-1760)
Hanoverian line, House of Hanover, Hanover - the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)
7.George - Elector of Hanover and the first Hanoverian King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1714 to 1727 (1660-1727)George - Elector of Hanover and the first Hanoverian King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1714 to 1727 (1660-1727)
Hanoverian line, House of Hanover, Hanover - the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)
Translations
Georg

George

[dʒɔːdʒ] NJorge

George

nGeorg m; by George! (dated Brit) → potz Blitz! (dated inf); (indicating determination) → bei Gott! (dated)
References in classic literature ?
With the spirit of prophecy upon me, I could look into the future and see her erect statues and monuments to her unspeakable Georges and other royal and noble clothes-horses, and leave unhonored the creators of this world -- after God -- Gutenburg, Watt, Arkwright, Whitney, Morse, Stephenson, Bell.
Take the Georges, Pew, and don't stand here squalling.
Georges Petit is going to collect all my best pictures for a special exhibition in the Rue de Seze, which will open the first week in October.
Philippe Georges Marie Comte de Chagny was just forty-one years of age.
He was Georges d'Amboise, created a cardinal by Alexander VI.
Dans le bon vieux temps," said the vicomtesse, examining me through her spectacles, and addressing Georges, who stood, hat in hand, to hearken to her wisdom; "dans le bon vieux temps, mon ami, the ladies of the chateau did not want for these things.
Nor does every husband feel bound to repeat at every step, "Tu l'as voulu, Georges Dandin
Irish Sketch Book,' and the 'Great Hoggarty Diamond,' and the 'Book of Snobs,' and the 'English Humorists,' and the 'Four Georges,' and all the multitude of his essays, and verses, and caricatures--as in the spacious designs of his huge novels, the 'Newcomes,' and 'Pendennis,' and 'Vanity Fair,' and 'Henry Esmond,' and 'Barry Lyndon.
77] The portraits of actors and other theatrical celebrities range from Elizabeth, from the melodramatic costumes and faces of the contemporaries of Shakespeare, to the conventional costumes, the rotund expression, of the age of the Georges, masking a power of imaginative impersonation probably unknown in Shakespeare's day.
AS you have already guessed by the number of prose writers you have been reading about, this age, the age of the last Stuarts and the first Georges, was not a poetic one.
When the visitor has mounted the crumbling steps of this ancient donjon, he reaches a little plateau where, in the seventeenth century, Georges Philibert de Sequigny, Lord of the Glandier, Maisons-Neuves and other places, built the existing town in an abominably rococo style of architecture.
Emmy cleared these away and put them on the drawers, where she placed her work-box, her desk, her Bible, and prayer-book, under the pictures of the two Georges.