dentistry

(redirected from Geriatric dentistry)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

den·tist·ry

 (dĕn′tĭ-strē)
n.
The science concerned with the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases of the teeth, gums, and related structures of the mouth and including the repair or replacement of defective teeth.

dentistry

(ˈdɛntɪstrɪ)
n
(Dentistry) the branch of medical science concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the teeth and gums

den•tist•ry

(ˈdɛn tə stri)

n.
the science or profession dealing with the prevention or treatment of diseases of the teeth, gums, and oral cavity, the correction or removal of decayed, damaged, or malformed parts, and the replacement of lost structures.
[1830–40]

den·tist·ry

(dĕn′tĭ-strē)
The branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases of the teeth, gums, and other structures of the mouth.

dentistry

the science and profession that treats the diseases and malformations of the teeth, gums, and mouth. — dentist, n.
See also: Medical Specialties
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dentistry - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teethdentistry - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teeth
crownwork, jacket crown, jacket, cap, crown - (dentistry) dental appliance consisting of an artificial crown for a broken or decayed tooth; "tomorrow my dentist will fit me for a crown"
dental appliance - a device to repair teeth or replace missing teeth
filling - (dentistry) a dental appliance consisting of any of various substances (as metal or plastic) inserted into a prepared cavity in a tooth; "when he yawned I could see the gold fillings in his teeth"; "an informal British term for `filling' is `stopping'"
impression - (dentistry) an imprint of the teeth and gums in wax or plaster; "the dentist took an impression for use in preparing an inlay"
inlay - (dentistry) a filling consisting of a solid substance (as gold or porcelain) fitted to a cavity in a tooth and cemented into place
occlusion - (dentistry) the normal spatial relation of the teeth when the jaws are closed
bonding - (dentistry) a technique for repairing a tooth; resinous material is applied to the surface of the tooth where it adheres to the tooth's enamel
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
cosmetic dentistry - the branch of dentistry dealing with the appearance of the teeth
dental surgery - the branch of dentistry involving surgical procedures
endodontia, endodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the dental pulp
dental orthopaedics, dental orthopedics, orthodontia, orthodontics, orthodonture - the branch of dentistry dealing with the prevention or correction of irregularities of the teeth
periodontia, periodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the gums and other structures around the teeth
prosthodontia, prosthodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with the replacement of teeth and related mouth or jaw structures by artificial devices
malocclusion - (dentistry) a condition in which the opposing teeth do not mesh normally
overbite - (dentistry) malocclusion in which the upper teeth extend abnormally far over the lower teeth
crowned - having an (artificial) crown on a tooth; "had many crowned teeth"
uncrowned - not having an (artificial) crown on a tooth; used especially of molars and bicuspids; "uncrowned teeth badly in need of attention"
Translations
طِب أسْنان
stomatologiezubní lékařství
tandbehandlingtandlægearbejde
רפואת שיניים
fogászat
tannlækningar
stomatológia
tandvård
dişçilik

dentistry

[ˈdentɪstrɪ] Nodontología f, dentistería f (CAm)

dentistry

[ˈdɛntɪstri] n
(= service) → chirurgie f dentaire
(= subject) → dentisterie f

dentistry

nZahnmedizin f, → Zahnheilkunde f

dentistry

[ˈdɛntɪstrɪ] nodontoiatria

dentist

(ˈdentist) noun
a person who cares for diseases etc of the teeth, by filling or removing them etc. Our dentist is very careful; I hate going to the dentist.
ˈdentistry noun
a dentist's work.

den·tis·try

n. arte o profesión de dentistas.

dentistry

n odontología; pediatric — odontopediatra
References in periodicals archive ?
TMDs as the orofacial form of these musculoskeletal disorders are not the most common group of diseases in geriatric dentistry practice, unlike problems related to restorative dentistry, especially prosthodontics (5,6).
2-4 Although interest in geriatric dentistry has increased in the dental profession worldwide, comprehensive data on the oral health status and dental treatment needs of the elderly population are deficient.
Criticisms, suggestions and recommendations regarding national oral health programs, dental manpower issues, geriatric dentistry, public health dentistry, dental insurance, oral health inequality, and public-private partnerships have taken major occupancies in the articles.
The NSDCC provides dental specialties services that include dental implants, crowns and bridges, geriatric dentistry, dentistry for children, cosmetic dentistry, sports-related dentistry, dental hygiene, laser dentistry, orthodontics and root canal treatment.
With a science degree in healthcare, Van der Torre put up a chain of clinics in the Netherlands, focusing on geriatric dentistry or oral care for the elderly.
Just as pediatric dentistry is an important dental specialty, geriatric dentistry should be offered as a specialty or residency at all dental schools.
She holds a Master of Public Health degree from Harvard School of Public Health, certificate in geriatric dentistry from Harvard School of Dental Medicine, DMD from the University of Connecticut, School of Dental Medicine, and a DD5 as well as MS in orthodontics from Seoul National University School of Dentistry.
A series of discussions was also held on best practices and policies in the field to tackle these challenges, supported by the presence of an international expert, Professor Antonio Carrassi, dean of the dental school of the University of Milan and chairman of the unit of oral medicine, oral pathology and geriatric dentistry at the Hospital San Paolo of Milan.
She has served on the ADAA Finance and Education Councils, and has authored the ADAA courses on Geriatric Dentistry, Oral Cancer Genetics, and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
The third heading, Changing Behaviors, includes chapters on the Behavioral Management Of Thumb Sucking, the Management of Children's Disruptive Behavior, the Nonpharmacological Approaches to Managing Pain and Anxiety, Self-Efficacy Perception in Oral Health Behavior, and Behavioral Issues in Geriatric Dentistry.

Full browser ?