U-boat

(redirected from German U-boats)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

U-boat

(yo͞o′bōt′)
n.
A submarine of the German navy.

[Translation of German U-Boot, short for Unterseeboot : unter, under (from Middle High German under, from Old High German untar; see n̥dher- in Indo-European roots) + See, sea (from Middle High German , from Old High German) + Boot, boat.]

U-boat

n
(Nautical Terms) a German submarine, esp in World Wars I and II
[from German U-Boot, abbreviation for Unterseeboot, literally: undersea boat]

U-boat

(ˈyuˌboʊt)

n.
a German submarine.
[1910–15; < German U-Boot, short for Unterseeboot literally, undersea boat]

U-boat

or “Unterseeboot” A German submarine.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.U-boat - a submersible warship usually armed with torpedoesU-boat - a submersible warship usually armed with torpedoes
attack submarine - a military submarine designed and armed to attack enemy shipping
auxiliary research submarine - a submarine for research purposes
conning tower - a raised bridge on a submarine; often used for entering and exiting
escape hatch - hatchway that provides a means of escape in an emergency
fleet ballistic missile submarine - a submarine carrying ballistic missiles
nautilus, nuclear submarine, nuclear-powered submarine - a submarine that is propelled by nuclear power
periscope - an optical instrument that provides a view of an otherwise obstructed field
schnorchel, schnorkel, snorkel breather, breather, snorkel - air passage provided by a retractable device containing intake and exhaust pipes; permits a submarine to stay submerged for extended periods of time
asdic, echo sounder, sonar - a measuring instrument that sends out an acoustic pulse in water and measures distances in terms of the time for the echo of the pulse to return; "sonar is an acronym for sound navigation ranging"; "asdic is an acronym for antisubmarine detection investigation committee"
submersible warship, submersible - a warship designed to operate under water
Translations

U-boat

[ˈjuːbəʊt] Nsubmarino m alemán

U-boat

nU-Boot nt

U-boat

[ˈjuːˌbəʊt] nsottomarino tedesco
References in periodicals archive ?
The changes had been prompted by the shortages of staple products caused by the war - and in particular by the attacks by German U-boats on Allied merchant shipping bringing food supplies to Britain.
Berube's testimony touches upon protocol for burial at sea, escorting frigates through the Panama Canal and a few of the fearsome encounters his convoys experienced when faced by German U-boats.
Of special note are such historical facts as half a dozen German submarines coming close enough to the Naval Operating Base in Bermuda to see Gibbs Hill; hardy Canadians from a sunken trading schooner rowed and sailed their way to the remote island on their own; and allied pilots based in Bermuda sank two German U-Boats, rescued dozens in daring water landings and several crashes.
AS the German U-boats spread to the waters of West Africa in WWII the RAF was the backbone of anti-submarine operations.
Damant headed the secret salvage effort, but was called off the salvage to lead a team of divers to search through recently sunk German U-boats for ciphers, minefield schematics, and other secrets, which were key in Allied efforts to defeat the U-boats and win the war.
The 93 German U-boats stationed in Belgian ports downed more than 2,500 ships but were also a target themselves, with 70 of them lost at sea, killing 1,200 sailors.
The battle's primary objective was to dislodge German forces from the high ground around the city of Ypres (now Ieper) and then advance to Belgian coastal ports from where German U-boats threatened Allied shipping.
That bit of the channel, already patrolled by German U-boats and Luftwaffe aircraft, was also too shallow for the big British ships to cross.
Success would mean stopping the German U-boats from sinking British merchant ships, carrying essential supplies to our shores.
The success against German U-boats by Allied aircraft might not have been much to talk about in 1918, but a definite effort was made, as witnessed by the number of French and American airfields along the Channel coast and the use of flying boats, whose crews engaged in often daily sweeps, looking for the elusive submarines that caused so much trouble for British and American surface traffic.
The perilous and freezing journey saw the convoy come under 18 attacks in two days from German U-boats and aircraft.
War is raging in Europe, and German U-boats are a real threat.