ethnocentrism

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eth·no·cen·trism

 (ĕth′nō-sĕn′trĭz′əm)
n.
1. Belief in the superiority of one's own ethnic group.
2. Overriding concern with ethnicity.

eth′no·cen′tric (-trĭk) adj.
eth′no·cen′tri·cal·ly adv.
eth′no·cen·tric′i·ty (-sĕn-trĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

ethnocentrism

(ˌɛθnəʊˈsɛnˌtrɪzəm)
n
(Sociology) belief in the intrinsic superiority of the nation, culture, or group to which one belongs, often accompanied by feelings of dislike for other groups
ˌethnoˈcentric adj
ˌethnoˈcentrically adv
ˌethnocenˈtricity n

eth•no•cen•trism

(ˌɛθ noʊˈsɛn trɪz əm)

n.
1. the belief in the inherent superiority of one's own ethnic group or culture.
2. a tendency to view alien groups or cultures from the perspective of one's own.
[1905–10]
eth`no•cen′tric, adj.
eth`no•cen′tri•cal•ly, adv.

ethnocentrism

the belief in the superiority of one’s own group or culture. Also ethnocentricity. — ethnocentric, adj.
See also: Anthropology

ethnocentrism

Invented by W.G. Summer to mean a “view of things in which one’s own group is the center of everything and all others are scaled and rated with reference to it.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ethnocentrism - belief in the superiority of one's own ethnic group
partisanship, partiality - an inclination to favor one group or view or opinion over alternatives
Translations
etnosentrisyysryhmäkeskeisyys
エスノセントリズム
etnocentrismo

ethnocentrism

[ˌeθnəʊˈsentrɪzəm] Netnocentrismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, McMeekin deserves credit for challenging the Germanocentrism that has come to dominate the historiography of the war's origins and for showing how far-reaching Russia's Near Eastern aspirations were.
He published little in the field of Ostforschung, which now seemed provincial for its agrarian romanticism and Germanocentrism, and turned instead to social history, focusing on the city and the industrialized world.
Such Germanocentrism leaves no room for Russian vernacular concepts that, if taken into account, would permit an interpretation of the young Lenin's intellectual trajectory and of WITBD that would be incompatible with what is proposed in Lenin Rediscovered.