germinant

germinant

(ˈdʒɜːmɪnənt)
adj
(Botany) in the process of germinating; sprouting
References in periodicals archive ?
In dryland riparian environments, a spring or summer flood pulse that either triggers or coincides with germination would promote establishment if it resulted in a moist surface soil to support germinant growth but the flood recession and accompanying soil drying was not so rapid that it outpaced growth of roots of seedlings to the deeper, permanent source of moisture needed for the post-flood growing season.
We transplanted seedlings from these trays into pots in which no germinants appeared within 2-3 weeks of sowing or resowing.
In seedbed trials, germinant density with alternative fumigants can equal that of methyl bromide or, as in the case of some dazomet trials, result in losses of up to one-third of the seed sown as the result of phytotoxicity from residual fumigant (Littke et al.
cereus spores, and germinant receptors--gerI5 and gerL1--played a role in the mechanism of germination induced by high pressure and elevated temperatures.
L-alanine was used as a germinant during the study (data not shown) since it had been reported that L-alanine could initiate germination of B.
At 37[degrees]C, as germination time increased, more Bt spores became vegetative cells with any type of germinant.
0152) with the greatest germination in the high oscillation (217 germinants from 600 seeds total) followed by low oscillation (34 germinants), warm (18 germinants) and cool (1 germinant) treatments (Fig.
Germinant ignition cholecystic sigmoid diamagnet hydrocutting