mutation

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Related to Germline mutation: somatic mutation

mu·ta·tion

 (myo͞o-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of being altered or changed.
2. An alteration or change, as in nature, form, or quality.
3. Genetics
a. A change in the nucleotide sequence of the genome of an organism or virus, sometimes resulting in the appearance of a new character or trait not found in the parental type.
b. The process by which such a change occurs, either through an alteration in the nucleotide sequence coding for a gene or through a change in the physical arrangement of the genetic material.
c. The nucleotide sequence, trait, or individual that results from such a change.
4. Linguistics
a. A change affecting a sound or a class of sounds, such as back vowels or plosive consonants, through assimilation to another sound, as in the process of umlaut.
b. A change affecting a sound or a class of sounds that is conditioned by morphological or syntactic factors rather than purely phonological factors, as in Irish, where certain words cause the lenition of the initial consonants of the following word.

[Middle English mutacioun, from Old French mutacion, from Latin mūtātiō, mūtātiōn-, from past participle of mūtāre, to change; see mutate.]

mu·ta′tion·al adj.
mu·ta′tion·al·ly adv.

mutation

(mjuːˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Genetics) the act or process of mutating; change; alteration
2. a change or alteration
3. (Genetics) a change in the chromosomes or genes of a cell. When this change occurs in the gametes the structure and development of the resultant offspring may be affected. See also inversion11
4. (Genetics) another word for mutant1
5. (Genetics) a physical characteristic of an individual resulting from this type of chromosomal change
6. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics
a. (in Germanic languages) another name for umlaut
b. (in Celtic languages) a phonetic change in certain initial consonants caused by a preceding word
muˈtational adj
muˈtationally adv

mu•ta•tion

(myuˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. Biol.
a. a sudden departure from the parent type in one or more heritable characteristics, caused by a change in a gene or a chromosome.
b. an individual, species, or the like resulting from such a departure.
2. the act or process of changing.
3. a change or alteration, as in form or nature.
4. a change in a speech sound caused by assimilation to a nearby sound, esp. umlaut.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin]
mu•ta′tion•al, adj.
mu•ta′tion•al•ly, adv.

mu·ta·tion

(myo͞o-tā′shən)
A change in the genes or chromosomes of an organism. Mutations occurring in the reproductive cells, such as an egg or sperm, can be passed from one generation to the next. Most mutations have harmful effects, but some can increase an organism's ability to survive. A mutation that benefits a species may evolve by means of natural selection into a trait shared by all members. See Note at sickle cell anemia.

Mutation

 of thrushes: group of moulting birds.

mutation

1. Inheritable change in a gene‘s DNA.
2. Change in a gene or genes of a living cell. A mutation in some way changes the cell’s characteristics and will be inherited. See chromosome, genes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mutation - (biology) an organism that has characteristics resulting from chromosomal alterationmutation - (biology) an organism that has characteristics resulting from chromosomal alteration
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
freak, lusus naturae, monstrosity, monster - a person or animal that is markedly unusual or deformed
2.mutation - (genetics) any event that changes genetic structure; any alteration in the inherited nucleic acid sequence of the genotype of an organism
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
alteration, change, modification - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another; "the change was intended to increase sales"; "this storm is certainly a change for the worse"; "the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago"
deletion - (genetics) the loss or absence of one or more nucleotides from a chromosome
inversion - (genetics) a kind of mutation in which the order of the genes in a section of a chromosome is reversed
transposition - (genetics) a kind of mutation in which a chromosomal segment is transfered to a new position on the same or another chromosome
mutagenesis - an event capable of causing a mutation
gene mutation, point mutation - (genetics) a mutation due to an intramolecular reorganization of a gene
reversion - (genetics) a return to a normal phenotype (usually resulting from a second mutation)
saltation - (genetics) a mutation that drastically changes the phenotype of an organism or species
3.mutation - a change or alteration in form or qualities
alteration, change, modification - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another; "the change was intended to increase sales"; "this storm is certainly a change for the worse"; "the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago"

mutation

noun
1. anomaly, variation, deviant, freak of nature Scientists have found a genetic mutation that causes the disease.
2. change, variation, evolution, transformation, modification, alteration, deviation, metamorphosis, transfiguration I was forced to watch my father's mutation from sober to drunk.

mutation

noun
1. The process or result of making or becoming different:
2. The process or result of changing from one appearance, state, or phase to another:
Translations
mutace
mutation
stökkbreyting
変異突然変異

mutation

[mjuːˈteɪʃən] Nmutación f

mutation

[mjuːˈteɪʃən] nmutation f

mutation

n (= process)Veränderung f; (= result)Variante f; (Biol) → Mutation f; (Ling) → Wandel m(to zu)

mutation

[mjuːˈteɪʃn] nmutazione f

mu·ta·tion

n. mutación, alteración, cambios espontáneos o inducidos en la estructura genética.

mutation

n mutación f; BRCA — mutación BRCA
References in periodicals archive ?
Genetic screening is extremely sensitive in MEN2 syndromes, and children of MTC families who are carriers of mutant genes are at risk and may be identified by detection of the germline mutation in the RET proto-oncogene.
The a priori likelihood of an underlying germline mutation may be high depending on the histologic phenotype of a tumor or may increase with further investigations that demonstrate loss of protein or function of a particular pathway.
Women who are carriers of a germline mutation in BRCAl or BRCA2 have the greatest risk of ovarian cancer--an estimated 15%-60% risk over a lifetime.
Although the majority of patients with pheochromocytomas have no family or medical history suggesting an inherited condition, up to one-third of patients have an identifiable germline mutation in one of these genes, and a pheochromocytoma maybe the first or only manifestation of the condition.
Nine of 14 germline mutation carriers had no first-degree family history of breast or ovarian cancer.
Women who are carriers of a germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 have the greatest risk of ovarian cancer - an estimated 15%-60% risk over a lifetime.
6) The identification of patients with the syndrome is key for proper treatment, as well as the identification of family members with the same germline mutation who require screening and surveillance.
This fact led to failure of the GS-FLX to identify a germline mutation in MSH2 known to cause Lynch syndrome (IVS5 + 3A>T, samples 2 and 6) (Table 4).
The familial form of liver adenomatosis involves a germline mutation of the HNF1A gene and is associated with MODY3.
The median age at diagnosis was 54 years in men and 70 years in women in a group of 70 Finnish families at risk for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) that comprised 88 probands and 373 individuals who tested positive for a germline mutation in MLH1 or MSH2 (Gastroenterology 2005;129:415-21).
The lifetime risk for CRC in individuals with a germline mutation in one of these genes is approximately 80%.
A germline mutation of the KIF1B beta gene on 1p36 in a family with neural and nonneural tumors.