Jekyll

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Jekyll

(ˈdʒɛkəl)
n
(Biography) Gertrude. 1843–1932, British landscape gardener: noted for her simplicity of design and use of indigenous plants
References in periodicals archive ?
I associate roses with beautiful old-fashioned gardens, with summertime, fragrance, pastel colours, Gertrude Jekyll and the Queen Mum.
I associate roses with beautiful oldfashioned gardens, with summertime, fragrance, pastel colours, Gertrude Jekyll and the Queen Mum.
Varieties looking stunning include Super Trouper, You're Beautiful, Aphrodite and Lady of Shalott, as well as English old rose hybrids such as Gertrude Jekyll and Darcey Bussell.
Gertrude Jekyll and the country house garden; from the archives of Country life.
The nation's favourite rose title went to Gertrude Jekyll, with rich pink old rose blooms, superb fragrance and disease resistance.
For at least 500 years this country has been famous for her gardens and gardeners and in the twentieth century Christopher Lloyd's name stands alongside Gertrude Jekyll, Lawrence Johnson and Vita Sackville-West.
The 684- acre island has an impressive Victorian mansion with 12 bedrooms, five reception rooms and three bathrooms, Gertrude Jekyll gardens, two cottages and a studio flat, a former lighthouse complex dating back to 1793 with three houses, a boathouse and a stone jetty that was used to land coal to fuel the original lighthouse fire.
The advent of Naturalism in garden design brought about by the demands of the cottage garden brought to the for by landscapers such as Gertrude Jekyll who emphasized the importance of flowers, rock gardens, and the shape and color of a maturing garden.
As Valentine's Day approaches, thoughts turn to romance and the creations pioneered by great designers like Gertrude Jekyll and William Robinson.
Renowned plantswoman Gertrude Jekyll was reputedly her close friend and designed, laid out and supervised the stocking of the beautiful formal garden.
In particular the English cottage garden, as written about by Gertrude Jekyll, Rudyard Kipling and Henry James, was portrayed as a safe haven wherein Englishness was nurtured.