Gestapo


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Related to Gestapo: Concentration camps

Ge·sta·po

 (gə-stä′pō, -shtä′-)
n.
1. The German internal security police as organized under the Nazi regime, known for its terrorist methods directed against those suspected of treason or questionable loyalty.
2. gestapo pl. ge·sta·pos A police organization that employs terroristic methods to control a populace.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of the German security police organized under the Nazi regime.
2. gestapo Of, relating to, or characteristic of terroristic police methods or operations: gestapo tactics.

[German Ge(heime) Sta(ats)po(lizei), secret state police : geheim, secret + Staat, state + Polizei, police.]

Gestapo

(ɡɛˈstɑːpəʊ; German ɡeˈʃtaːpo)
n
(Historical Terms) the secret state police in Nazi Germany, noted for its brutal methods of interrogation
[from German Ge(heime) Sta(ats)po(lizei), literally: secret state police]

Ge•sta•po

(gəˈstɑ poʊ)

n.
the German secret police during the Nazi regime, notorious for its brutality.
[< German (1933), acronym for Ge(heime)Sta(ats)po(lizei) secret state police]

Gestapo

“Geheime Staatspolizei” The German secret state police, established by Goering in 1933 to arrest and murder opponents of the Nazi Party. Enlarged under Himmler 1934, it became part of the SS 1936.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gestapo - the secret state police in Nazi Germany; known for its terrorist methods
act of terrorism, terrorism, terrorist act - the calculated use of violence (or the threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature; this is done through intimidation or coercion or instilling fear
secret police - a police force that operates in secrecy (usually against persons suspected of treason or sedition)
Schutzstaffel, SS - special police force in Nazi Germany founded as a personal bodyguard for Adolf Hitler in 1925; the SS administered the concentration camps
Translations

Gestapo

[gesˈtɑːpəʊ] NGestapo f

Gestapo

nGestapo f
References in periodicals archive ?
Clara had been recruited by the Gestapo and, with Jakobs, was given the job of creating a spy cell over here.
Another protester at the site, Detlef Baade, whose father was tortured by Hamburg's Gestapo in 1933 told&nbsp;German news paper SA ddeutsche Zeitung: "Nobody who was brought here for interrogation came out unhurt.
For them, the Gestapo and SS Security Service (SD) offered steady work, frequent promotions, and the opportunity to exercise real political power in the service of the racially defined "people's community.
Jewish Abholer (Collectors) were used by the Gestapo to search residences and round up Jews on the community deportation lists.
Kylycdaroy-lu had accused MyT of carrying out an operation to create dissent within the CHP and likened MyT to the Gestapo.
The persecution of the Catholic Church continued unabated with thousands of nuns and priests incarcerated on trumped up charges, the Catholic press effectively silenced and even the sanctity of the confessional violated by the hated Gestapo.
The Gestapo rounded many up and they were taken to death camps in occupied Poland.
The whole scene was a sort of Kafka fantasy--a tranquil garden, bathed in morning sunshine that reflected from the pool; the misty spray of the fountain creating a miniature rainbow in the middle of the Gestapo headquarters, Poland, 1942.
This study recounts the three-year manhunt through postwar Germany, ordered by Winston Churchill, for the 21 Gestapo gunmen who shot the POWs, and describes the final conclusion of the case 20 years later.
Wing commander Forest Yeo-Thomas was a fashion house manager turned spy, who teased and tormented the Gestapo for two years before falling into their clutches.
The newspaper says the letter from the SS paramilitary organisation was discovered in official archives containing files the Nazi secret police, or Gestapo, kept on Jewish lawyers and judges.
A file kept by the Dusseldorf Gestapo on him includes the letter from the head of the Gestapo and the SS, Heinrich Himmler, dated August 27, 1940, saying Hess must receive 'relief and protection as per the Fuhrer's wishes'.