ghostwriter

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ghost·writ·er

 (gōst′rī′tər)
n.
One who writes for and gives credit of authorship to another.

ghost′writ`er

or ghost′ writ`er,


n.
a person who writes a speech, book, article, etc., for another person who is named as or presumed to be the author.
[1895–1900, Amer.]
ghost′write`, v.t., v.i. -wrote, -writ•ten, -writ•ing.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ghostwriter - a writer who gives the credit of authorship to someone else
author, writer - writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)
Translations
spökskrivare

ghostwriter

[ˈgəʊstˌraɪtəʳ] Nnegro/a m/f

ghostwriter

[ˈgəʊstraɪtər] nnègre m (fig)

ghostwriter

[ˈgəʊstˌraɪtəʳ] nghost writer m/f inv, scrittore/trice fantasma inv
References in periodicals archive ?
It comes two weeks after Ma released 'Shether,' a blistering track where she claims Minaj uses ghostwriters and attacks her appearance.
According to Styles P, it all comes down to allegations that claim Drake used ghostwriters to write his lyrics.
Joe DiPietro's comedy is an airy adaptation of "Peccadillo," Garson Kanin's 1985 spoof of a famed soprano and her temperamental husband (call him "Maestro") played by Douglas Sills, who separately hire ghostwriters (a boy for her, a girl for him) to pen their memoirs.
The millionaire mum-offive, 36, admits ghostwriters have again done the hard graft.
One of the country's best-selling ghostwriters and authors visited Flint High School to talk to students about his work.
Most ghostwriters work for agencies - in Germany, companies such as Dr Franke Consulting and GWriters broker writers and earn a commission.
Rejoinders from poorly informed critics, particularly those who confuse ghostwriters with professional medical writers, often dominated the responses to such reports (Figure 2).
com)-- The Association of Ghostwriters recently debuted its new website, at www.
In a feature story about culinary ghostwriters, The New York Times described Julia Turshen as being one for Paltrow in 'My Father's Daughter', RadarOnline reported.
He did his homework, interviewing real ghostwriters and pulling epigraphs from a handbook by "Britain's foremost ghostwriter," and his novel makes for some biting (if predictable) satire.
Drugmaker use of ghostwriters has created "a huge body of medical literature that society can't trust," said Carl Elliott, a University of Minnesota bioethicist who has written about the practice.
It was reported by Zaitseu, but his memoirs were almost certainly exaggerated or completely falsified by Commie ghostwriters.