Gibraltar


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Related to Gibraltar: Rock of Gibraltar

Gi·bral·tar 1

 (jə-brôl′tər)
A British colony centered around the heavily fortified Rock of Gibraltar, a strategically located peninsula on the north side of the Strait of Gibraltar, connecting the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean between Spain and northern Africa. Gibraltar was captured by Arabs in 711 and passed to the Spanish in 1462. Great Britain captured Gibraltar in 1704 and was granted sovereignty by treaty in 1713.

Gi·bral′tar′i·an (-târ′ē-ən) adj. & n.

Gi·bral·tar 2

 (jə-brôl′tər)
n.
An invincible fortress or stronghold.

Gibraltar

(dʒɪˈbrɔːltə)
n
1. (Placename) City of Gibraltar a city on the Rock of Gibraltar, a limestone promontory at the tip of S Spain: settled by Moors in 711 and taken by Spain in 1462; ceded to Britain in 1713; a British crown colony (1830–1969), still politically associated with Britain; a naval and air base of strategic importance. Pop: 29 111 (2013 est). Area: 6.5 sq km (2.5 sq miles). Ancient name: Calpe
2. (Placename) Strait of Gibraltar a narrow strait between the S tip of Spain and the NW tip of Africa, linking the Mediterranean with the Atlantic

Gi•bral•tar

(dʒɪˈbrɔl tər)

n.
1. a British crown colony comprising a fortress and seaport located on a narrow promontory near the S tip of Spain. 29,934; 1? sq. mi. (5 sq. km).
2. Rock of. Ancient, Calpe. a long, precipitous mountain nearly coextensive with this colony: one of the Pillars of Hercules. 1396 ft. (426 m) high; 2½ mi. (4 km) long.
3. Strait of, a strait between Europe and Africa at the Atlantic entrance to the Mediterranean. 8½–23 mi. (14–37 km) wide.
4. any impregnable fortress or stronghold.
Gi•bral•tar′i•an (-ˈtɛər i ən) adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gibraltar - location of a colony of the United Kingdom on a limestone promontory at the southern tip of SpainGibraltar - location of a colony of the United Kingdom on a limestone promontory at the southern tip of Spain; strategically important because it can control the entrance of ships into the Mediterranean; one of the Pillars of Hercules
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
Pillars of Hercules - the two promontories at the eastern end of the Strait of Gibraltar; according to legend they were formed by Hercules
Gibraltarian - a native or inhabitant of Gibraltar
Translations

Gibraltar

[dʒɪˈbrɔːltəʳ] NGibraltar m

Gibraltar

[dʒɪˈbrɔːltər] nGibraltar

Gibraltar

nGibraltar nt

Gibraltar

[dʒɪˈbrɔːltəʳ] nGibilterra
References in classic literature ?
For instance, there was a glass pickle-jar, filled with fragments of Gibraltar rock; not, indeed, splinters of the veritable stone foundation of the famous fortress, but bits of delectable candy, neatly done up in white paper.
Because Joppa, the modern Jaffa, shipmates, is on the most easterly coast of the Mediterranean, the Syrian; and Tarshish or Cadiz more than two thousand miles to the westward from that, just outside the Straits of Gibraltar.
Such an enterprise would seem almost as hopeful as for Lavater to have scrutinized the wrinkles on the Rock of Gibraltar, or for Gall to have mounted a ladder and manipulated the Dome of the Pantheon.
In the main street of Gibraltar we saw three red hairs lying on a wheel- barrow before a baker's door.
As when the potent Rod Of AMRAMS Son in EGYPTS evill day Wav'd round the Coast, up call'd a pitchy cloud Of LOCUSTS, warping on the Eastern Wind, That ore the Realm of impious PHAROAH hung Like Night, and darken'd all the Land of NILE: So numberless were those bad Angels seen Hovering on wing under the Cope of Hell 'Twixt upper, nether, and surrounding Fires; Till, as a signal giv'n, th' uplifted Spear Of their great Sultan waving to direct Thir course, in even ballance down they light On the firm brimstone, and fill all the Plain; A multitude, like which the populous North Pour'd never from her frozen loyns, to pass RHENE or the DANAW, when her barbarous Sons Came like a Deluge on the South, and spread Beneath GIBRALTAR to the LYBIAN sands.
It was a Gibraltar of security to the Bell Company.
It was the advice of some of them to throw us all into the sea wrapped up in a sail; for their purpose was to trade at some of the ports of Spain, giving themselves out as Bretons, and if they brought us alive they would be punished as soon as the robbery was discovered; but the captain (who was the one who had plundered my beloved Zoraida) said he was satisfied with the prize he had got, and that he would not touch at any Spanish port, but pass the Straits of Gibraltar by night, or as best he could, and make for La Rochelle, from which he had sailed.
The 6th of February, the Nautilus floated in sight of Aden, perched upon a promontory which a narrow isthmus joins to the mainland, a kind of inaccessible Gibraltar, the fortifications of which were rebuilt by the English after taking possession in 1839.
He gazed with wonder upon the fortifications which make this place the Gibraltar of the Indian Ocean, and the vast cisterns where the English engineers were still at work, two thousand years after the engineers of Solomon.
A light yacht, chaste and elegant in its form, was gliding amidst the first dews of night over the immense lake, extending from Gibraltar to the Dardanelles, and from Tunis to Venice.
Brown, and the other women at the Commissioner's at Gibraltar, appeared in the same trim, I thought they were mad; but Fanny can reconcile me to anything"; and saw, with lively admiration, the glow of Fanny's cheek, the brightness of her eye, the deep interest, the absorbed attention, while her brother was describing any of the imminent hazards, or terrific scenes, which such a period at sea must supply.
I have crossed the Atlantic four times, and have been once to the East Indies, and back again, and only once; besides being in different places about home: Cork, and Lisbon, and Gibraltar.