electronvolt

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electronvolt

(ɪˌlɛktrɒnˈvəʊlt)
n
(Units) a unit of energy equal to the work done on an electron accelerated through a potential difference of 1 volt. 1 electronvolt is equivalent to 1.602 × 10–19 joule. Symbol: eV

electronvolt

(eV) A unit of energy representing the energy acquired by an electron in passing through a potential difference of 1 volt. 1 eV = (1.6 ± 0.000 07) x 10-19 J.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the vicinity of a spinning supermassive black hole (billions of times heavier than our Sun) an enormous amount of energy is released, often in the most energetic form of light: high energy gamma-ray photons at mega- or even gigaelectronvolt (MeV/GeV) energies.
It had a mass of 125 gigaelectronvolts, give or take a gigaelectronvolt, and decayed into other particles such as W and Z bosons at predictable rates.
LHC is designed to search for the elusive Higgs boson and study new physics predicted to exist at the 1,000 gigaelectronvolt (GeV) scale (approximately 1,000 times larger than the mass of a proton).
His team has produced electrons with an energy of 1 gigaelectronvolt after about 1 centimeter of acceleration.
If the existence of the bump, which had hinted toward an unexpected excess of pairs of photons carrying around 750 gigaelectronvolts of combined energy, had been confirmed, it would have provided us the first direct evidence of a particle - roughly six times more massive than the Higgs boson - that would have broken the (https://home.
Both experiments see strong indications for the presence of a new particle, which could be the Higgs boson, in the mass region around 126 gigaelectronvolts (GeV).
3 gigaelectronvolts (GeV) - about 133 times heavier than the proton at the heart of every atom, BBC informs.
Identifying the Higgs will be done by detecting the way it decays into other particles with data so far suggesting it is most likely to lie within a narrow energy band of between 115 and 130 gigaelectronvolts.
The teams - Atlas and CMS - said their data showed "spikes" at roughly the same mass - 124 to 125 gigaelectronvolts.
57 GeV/c - that is, gigaelectronvolts divided by the speed of light - the particles are moving at almost 97 percent of the speed of light; at 0.
In particular, a tantalizing "bump" in 2015 data at 750 gigaelectronvolts, which had been previously detected by the ATLAS and CMS detectors, did not resurface in the much larger 2016 dataset, suggesting that it was, in all probability, the result of a statistical fluctuation.
The "all-sky map" represents all of the gamma-ray detections above 10 gigaelectronvolts that the Fermi telescope has seen in three years' worth of data.