Gitmo


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Gitmo

(ˈɡɪtməʊ)
n
(Placename) informal chiefly US Guantánamo: referring more specifically to the detainment camp run here by the US military, in which suspected terrorists are detained and questioned
References in periodicals archive ?
While detailing controversial interrogation methods employed at Gitmo, the documents also reportedly outline the government's policies of making persons of interest "disappear" by failing to mark their location in military records.
With US Justice Department's declaration that the Uighurs should no longer be classified as "enemy combatants," they are among the least threatening Gitmo detainees.
But now the Virginia Democrat opposes closing Gitmo anytime soon while observing to ABC's George Stephanopoulos on Sunday that ''We spend hundreds of millions of dollars building an appropriate facility with all security precautions in Guantanamo to try these cases.
During this period, the FBI was part of a flood of more than 120 other intelligence agencies that observed or participated in interrogations at Gitmo," Hickman wrote.
Shaker Aamer, the last Briton still in the top-security lock-up nicknamed Gitmo, discovered the ban when his lawyer tried to bring him the 38-year-old comic's raunchy autobiography, right.
Bey, 39, agreed to participate in this graphic demo as part of a project attempting to demonstrate what it's like to be a Gitmo prisoner.
Obama promised to close Gitmo on his first day in office, but Congress has thwarted his efforts at every turn, despite clear evidence the prison has outlived its usefulness, is too expensive and gives America's enemies a powerful recruiting tool.
This confusion complicated the release of five Taliban prisoners from Gitmo during reconciliation talks in 2011; it confounded the Afghan government's efforts to seek release of eight other Afghans; and it helped fuel a hunger strike described by one prisoner in a recent article titled "Gitmo Is Killing Me.
In the past, Gitmo has sheltered thousands of desperate Haitians and Cubans, and in the mid-1990s even hosted refugees from war-torn Kosovo.
First, though the book touches on various counterterrorism policies, two predominate: (1) the administration's expansion of drone strikes in Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia; and (2) its effort, abandoned in the face of congressional opposition, to close Gitmo and to release or try the suspected terrorists there in civilian court.
Dennis, who lives in Canada, said the plea bargain was a way of getting Khadr back to Canada from the maximum security detention camp, nicknamed Gitmo, where he claims his client was tortured.
THE GITMO BAR GOES 0-8 (The Wall Street Journal, New York)