Julius II

(redirected from Giuliano della Rovere)
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Ju·lius II

 (jo͞ol′yəs) Originally Giuliano della Rovere. 1443-1513.
Pope (1503-1513) who enlarged the temporal power of the papacy and was active in military campaigns in Europe. He also ordered the construction of Saint Peter's in Rome and commissioned Michelangelo to decorate the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican.

Julius II

(ˈdʒuːljəs; -lɪəs)
n
(Biography) original name Guiliano della Rovere. 1443–1513, pope (1503–13). He completed the restoration of the Papal States to the Church, began the building of St Peter's, Rome (1506), and patronized Michelangelo, Raphael, and Bramante
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Julius II was Giuliano della Rovere, Cardinal of San Pietro ad Vincula, born 1443, died 1513.
Este libro encomiable en muchos aspectos seria aun mejor si hubiera partido de la evidencia de que no es posible entender la actuacion del polemico Giuliano della Rovere sin tener en cuenta al reino de Napoles y, sobre todo, a esa emergente Monarquia de Espana silenciada por Rospocher para conceder un sorprendente protagonismo a la lejana y aun marginal Inglaterra.
She gives a vivid insight on how the Spaniard outfoxed the strong Italian lobby and beat his strong rival Giuliano della Rovere to the papacy with silver and gold.
The shortest papal conclave took place in October 1503 when Giuliano della Rovere was elected as Pope Julius II, succeeding Pope Pius III it took just ten hours.
Giuliano della Rovere, elected Pope Julius II in 1503 by an overwhelming majority of his fellow cardinals, was the pontiff who commissioned Michelangelo to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and founded the Swiss Guard for his personal protection.
Alberti, along with della Francesca, introduced Pacioli to the ecclesiastical hierarchy, including Francesco della Rovere, the newly elected Pope Sixtus IV, and his 28-year-old nephew Giuliano della Rovere, whom he had appointed a cardinal.
Lisa Passaglia Beauman investigates della Rovere commissions at Santa Maria del Popolo; Henry Dietrich Fernandez explores the architectural patronage of Cardinal Giuliano della Rovere, later Julius II; and Ian Verstegen discusses Cardinal Giulio Feltre della Rovere.