gizzard

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giz·zard

 (gĭz′ərd)
n.
1. A modified muscular pouch behind the stomach in the digestive tract of birds, having a thick lining and often containing ingested grit that aids in the breakdown of seeds before digestion.
2. A similar digestive organ found in certain invertebrates, such as the earthworm.

[Alteration of Middle English giser, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *gicērium, from Latin gigēria, cooked entrails of poultry, probably of Iranian origin; akin to Persian jigar, liver; see yē̆kw in Indo-European roots.]

gizzard

(ˈɡɪzəd)
n
1. (Zoology) the thick-walled part of a bird's stomach, in which hard food is broken up by muscular action and contact with grit and small stones
2. (Zoology) a similar structure in many invertebrates
3. informal the stomach and entrails generally
[C14: from Old North French guisier fowl's liver, alteration of Latin gigēria entrails of poultry when cooked, of uncertain origin]

giz•zard

(ˈgɪz ərd)

n.
1. Also called ventriculus. the thick-walled, muscular lower stomach of many birds and reptiles that grinds partially digested food, often with the aid of ingested gravel.
2. a similar structure in the foregut of arthropods and annelids, often lined with chitin and small teeth.
3. the innards or viscera collectively, esp. the intestine and stomach.
[1325–75; Middle English giser < Old French giser, gezier < Vulgar Latin *gigerium; compare Latin gigeria, gizeria giblets, probably ultimately < Iranian]

giz·zard

(gĭz′ərd)
A muscular pouch behind the stomach in birds. It has a thick lining and often contains swallowed sand or grit, which helps to break food into small pieces.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gizzard - thick-walled muscular pouch below the crop in many birds and reptiles for grinding foodgizzard - thick-walled muscular pouch below the crop in many birds and reptiles for grinding food
pouch, pocket - (anatomy) saclike structure in any of various animals (as a marsupial or gopher or pelican)
Translations

gizzard

[ˈgɪzəd] Nmolleja f
it sticks in my gizzard (fig) → no lo puedo tragar

gizzard

nMuskelmagen m
References in classic literature ?
Savory morsels of ham, golden blocks of corn-cake, fragments of pie of every conceivable mathematical figure, chicken wings, gizzards, and drumsticks, all appeared in picturesque confusion; and Sam, as monarch of all he surveyed, sat with his palm-leaf cocked rejoicingly to one side, and patronizing Andy at his right hand.
All this they read with saucer eyes, and erect and primitive curiosity, and with unwearied gizzard, whose corrugations even yet need no sharpening, just as some little four-year-old bencher his two-cent gilt-covered edition of Cinderella -- without any improvement, that I can see, in the pronunciation, or accent, or emphasis, or any more skill in extracting or inserting the moral.
Nay, I spied nothing," grumbled Sir Oliver, "for I was hurried down with a clam stuck in my gizzard and an untasted goblet of Cyprus on the board behind me.
But the following fact is more important: the crops of birds do not secrete gastric juice, and do not in the least injure, as I know by trial, the germination of seeds; now after a bird has found and devoured a large supply of food, it is positively asserted that all the grains do not pass into the gizzard for 12 or even 18 hours.
Jos descended from the post-chaise and down the creaking swaying steps in awful state, supported by the new valet from Southampton and the shuddering native, whose brown face was now livid with cold and of the colour of a turkey's gizzard.
A hero, you know, must hold himself in readiness for any kind of fate; and doubtless the glory of the thing was a consolation to him, even in the crane's gizzard.
It feeds on the delicate sea-weeds which grow among the stones in muddy and shallow water; and I found in its stomach several small pebbles, as in the gizzard of a bird.
In the porkers he saw carved out the future sleek side of bacon, and juicy relishing ham; not a turkey but he beheld daintily trussed up, with its gizzard under its wing, and, peradventure, a necklace of savory sausages; and even bright chanticleer himself lay sprawling on his back, in a side dish, with uplifted claws, as if craving that quarter which his chivalrous spirit disdained to ask while living.
Part 2 - poultry meat chicken back quarters - 40 250 kg chicken breast fillet - 3 260 kg chicken liver - 15 700 kg chicken gizzards - 19 800 kg chicken wings - 7 700 kg chicken ground meat - 22 800 kg chicken cutlets - 12,900 kg
He sold such a big variety of chicken, including gizzards, livers and hearts, that when a character called Chicken George appeared on the '70s TV show, Roots, the nickname stuck to Mr Mather as well.
These were the same things I grew up eating, which my motherwho now has a strong Jewish rather than Presbyterian identity, albeit without any religious underpinningsstill makes today: roast goose liver, beef soup with matzo balls, green pea soup cooked with chicken necks, gizzards, and liver.
But once again the beloved Mang Larry's Isawan is feeling the heat and may have to take its menu of skewered gizzards and intestines elsewhere on the campus, after the UP Swimming Varsity Team complained about the smoke affecting the athletes' daily practice.