erosion

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e·ro·sion

 (ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
1. The group of natural processes, including weathering, dissolution, abrasion, corrosion, and transportation, by which material is worn away from the earth's surface.
2. The superficial destruction of bodily tissue by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.
3. The process of eroding or the condition of being eroded: erosion of confidence in the governor; erosion of the value of the dollar.

[Latin ērōsiō, ērōsiōn-, an eating away, from ērōsus, eaten away; see erose.]

e·ro′sion·al adj.
e·ro′sion·al·ly adv.

erosion

(ɪˈrəʊʒən)
n
1. (Geological Science) the wearing away of rocks and other deposits on the earth's surface by the action of water, ice, wind, etc
2. the act or process of eroding or the state of being eroded
eˈrosive, eˈrosional adj

e•ro•sion

(ɪˈroʊ ʒən)

n.
1. the act or process of eroding.
2. the state of being eroded.
3. the process by which the surface of the earth is worn away by the action of water, glaciers, winds, waves, etc.
[1535–45; < Latin ērōsiō. See erode, -tion]
e•ro′sion•al, adj.

e·ro·sion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
The gradual wearing away of land surface materials, especially rocks, sediments, and soils, by the action of water, wind, or a glacier. Usually erosion also involves the transfer of eroded material from one place to another, as from the top of a mountain to an adjacent valley, or from the upstream portion of a river to the downstream portion.

erosion

The removal of loose mineral particles by wind, water, and moving ice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.erosion - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)erosion - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
chatter mark - marks on a glaciated rock caused by the movement of a glacier
ablation - the erosive process that reduces the size of glaciers
attrition, corrasion, detrition, abrasion - erosion by friction
beach erosion - the erosion of beaches
geologic process, geological process - (geology) a natural process whereby geological features are modified
deflation - (geology) the erosion of soil as a consequence of sand and dust and loose rocks being removed by the wind; "a constant deflation of the desert landscape"
planation - the process of erosion whereby a level surface is produced
soil erosion - the washing away of soil by the flow of water
2.erosion - condition in which the earth's surface is worn away by the action of water and wind
environmental condition - the state of the environment
3.erosion - a gradual decline of something; "after the accounting scandal there was an erosion of confidence in the auditors"
decline, diminution - change toward something smaller or lower
4.erosion - erosion by chemical action
chemical action, chemical change, chemical process - (chemistry) any process determined by the atomic and molecular composition and structure of the substances involved
pitting, indentation, roughness - the formation of small pits in a surface as a consequence of corrosion
rusting, rust - the formation of reddish-brown ferric oxides on iron by low-temperature oxidation in the presence of water

erosion

noun
1. disintegration, deterioration, corrosion, corrasion, wearing down or away, grinding down erosion of the river valleys
2. deterioration, wearing, undermining, destruction, consumption, weakening, spoiling, attrition, eating away, abrasion, grinding down, wearing down or away an erosion of moral standards
Translations
تأكُّل، تآكُل، تَعْرِيَه
eroze
erosionudhulning
eroosiokuluminensyöpyminen
erozija
erózió
veîrun, eyîing, uppblástur
erózia
aşın maerozyon

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒən] N
1. (Geol) → erosión f; [of metal] → corrosión f
2. (fig) → desgaste m

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒən] n
[soil, rock] → érosion f
[freedom, confidence] → érosion f

erosion

n (by water, glaciers, rivers) → Erosion f, → Abtragung f; (by acid) → Ätzung f; (fig, of love etc) → Schwinden nt; (of power, values, beliefs)Untergrabung f; (of authority)Unterminierung f; (of differentials)Aushöhlen nt; (of value)Abtragung f, → Untergrabung f; an erosion of confidence in the poundein Vertrauensverlust mor -schwund mdes Pfundes

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒn] n (see vb) → erosione f, corrosione f

erode

(iˈrəud) verb
to eat or wear away (metals etc); to destroy gradually. Acids erode certain metals; Water has eroded the rock; The individual's right to privacy is being eroded.
eˈrosion (-ʒən) noun

e·ro·sion

n. erosión, desgaste.

erosion

n erosión f
References in periodicals archive ?
Upper Cretaceous strata are not found in the western part of the Arctic Slope, possibly due to Cretaceous to early Cenozoic uplift or later glacial erosion.
In this study we used ice-penetrating radar, magnetic and gravity data, to determine the thickness of the ice-sheet and the sediment thickness under the ice sheet, which we then used to map glacial erosion beneath the ice sheet, Dr Roberts said.
Nicholas Guitard revisits Ganong's explorations and, in a warm and conversational style, illuminates Ganong's contributions to our present geographical knowledge of New Brunswick and traces the effects of millennia of glacial erosion and tectonic upheaval as well as the more recent effects of human settlement and resource exploitation.
The seesaw competition between glacial erosion and plate tectonics in shaping mountains is--at least in some cases--being won by the glaciers, according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
e glacial erosion has also contributed in the creation of a stunning landscape.
uite so cold for another Sundog, the Maligne -flowing rivers of the distance from Jasper eze over to leave s, frozen waterfalls and Guide Joan Dillon leads our group of heavily wrapped-up visitors along the two-mile valley - the deepest accessible canyon in the national park - and explains the causes of the rugged karst topography and the effects of glacial erosion.
Wisconsinan glacial erosion was significant at the site as indicated by glacial striae, roche moutinee, lee side plucking features and numerous large erratics (Spooner et al.
Lower Palaeozoic unconformities in an intracratonic platform setting: glacial erosion versus tectonics in the eastern Murzuq Basin (southern Libya).
The Cairngorms is geographically significant because it's Britain's most extensive area of Arctioalpine habitat, with rounded granite peaks and valleys formed by glacial erosion.
1993), has led to the suggestion that enhanced exhumation is a response to glacial erosion in the Quaternary.