moraine

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mo·raine

 (mə-rān′)
n.
An accumulation of boulders, stones, or other debris carried and deposited by a glacier.

[French, from French dialectal morena, mound of earth, from Provençal morre, muzzle, from Vulgar Latin *murrum.]

mo·rain′al, mo·rain′ic adj.

moraine

(mɒˈreɪn)
n
(Physical Geography) a mass of debris, carried by glaciers and forming ridges and mounds when deposited
[C18: from French, from Savoy dialect morena, of obscure origin]
moˈrainal, moˈrainic adj

mo•raine

(məˈreɪn)

n.
1. a ridge, mound, or irregular mass of unstratified glacial drift, chiefly boulders, gravel, sand, and clay.
2. a deposit of such material left on the ground by a glacier.
[1780–90; < French < Franco-Provençal morêna rise in the ground =mour(o) mound + -ena suffix of landforms]
mo•rain′al, mo•rain′ic, adj.

mo·raine

(mə-rān′)
A mass of boulders, pebbles, sand, and mud deposited in the form of a long ridge along the front or sides of a glacier. Moraines typically form because of the plowing effect of a moving glacier, which causes it to pick up rock fragments and sediments as it moves, and because of the periodic melting of the ice, which causes the glacier to deposit these materials during warmer intervals. ♦ A moraine that forms in front of a glacier is a terminal moraine. ♦ A moraine that forms along the side of a glacier is a lateral moraine.

moraine

Rock debris moved or dumped by a melting glacier or ice sheet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moraine - accumulated earth and stones deposited by a glaciermoraine - accumulated earth and stones deposited by a glacier
glacier - a slowly moving mass of ice
earth, ground - the loose soft material that makes up a large part of the land surface; "they dug into the earth outside the church"
Translations

moraine

[mɒˈreɪn] Nmorena f

moraine

nMoräne f

moraine

[mɒˈreɪn] nmorena
References in periodicals archive ?
Legend has it that these ridges are the remains of causeways built to give access to the present mainland at high tide, but they are probably the remains of glacial moraines - formations of gravel, clay, sand and boulders left behind as the glaciers melted away at the end of the last Ice Age.
While geologists and climate physicists found solid evidence of this 100,000-year cycle in glacial moraines, marine sediments and arctic ice, until now they were unable to find a plausible explanation for it.
These interconnected creeks originate from huge glaciers and glacial moraines at the upper catchments.
The results are based on the CRONUS-Earth Project, which aims to improve measurements of these isotopes so precise ages may be assigned to 'young' glacial moraines," said Enriqueta Barrera, program director in the National Science Foundation (NSF)'s Division of Earth Sciences, which funded the research.
Sears (1925) pointed out a correlation of the natural tree vegetation with certain physical features such as the distribution of oak and beech in relation to the system of glacial moraines (Fig.
Glacial moraines show that glaciers have advanced and receded many times.