gladiator

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glad·i·a·tor

 (glăd′ē-ā′tər)
n.
1. A person, usually a professional combatant, a captive, or a slave, trained to entertain the public by engaging in mortal combat with another person or a wild animal in the ancient Roman arena.
2. A person engaged in a controversy or debate, especially in public; a disputant.
3. Sports A professional boxer.

[Middle English, from Latin gladiātor, from gladius, sword, of Celtic origin; akin to Old Irish claideb.]

glad′i·a·to′ri·al (-ə-tôr′ē-əl) adj.

gladiator

(ˈɡlædɪˌeɪtə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome and Etruria) a man trained to fight in arenas to provide entertainment
2. a person who supports and fights publicly for a cause
[C16: from Latin: swordsman, from gladius sword]

glad•i•a•tor

(ˈglæd iˌeɪ tər)

n.
1. (in ancient Rome) a man compelled to fight to the death in a public arena for the entertainment of spectators.
2. someone who engages in a fight or controversy.
3. a prizefighter.
[1535–45; < Latin gladiātor, derivative of gladi(us) sword]
glad`i•a•to′ri•al (-əˈtɔr i əl, -ˈtoʊr-) adj.

gladiator

, gladiate - The main Latin word for sword was gladius, from which came gladiator; gladiate is an adjective meaning sword-shaped.
See also related terms for sword.

gladiator

An armed fighter for arena contests. Up to 5000 pairs could perform in one spectacle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gladiator - (ancient Rome) a professional combatant or a captive who entertained the public by engaging in mortal combatgladiator - (ancient Rome) a professional combatant or a captive who entertained the public by engaging in mortal combat
capital of Italy, Eternal City, Italian capital, Rome, Roma - capital and largest city of Italy; on the Tiber; seat of the Roman Catholic Church; formerly the capital of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire
battler, belligerent, combatant, fighter, scrapper - someone who fights (or is fighting)
antiquity - the historic period preceding the Middle Ages in Europe
2.gladiator - a professional boxergladiator - a professional boxer      
boxer, pugilist - someone who fights with his fists for sport
featherweight - a professional boxer who weighs between 123 and 126 pounds
heavyweight - a professional boxer who weighs more than 190 pounds
cruiserweight, light heavyweight - a professional boxer who weighs between 169 and 175 pounds
lightweight - a professional boxer who weighs between 131 and 135 pounds
middleweight - a professional boxer who weighs between 155 and 160 pounds
welterweight - a professional boxer who weighs between 141 and 147 pounds
Translations
مُجالِد، مُصارِع
gladiátor
gladiator
gladiátor
skylmingaòræll
gladiatorius
gladiators
gladiátor

gladiator

[ˈglædɪeɪtəʳ] Ngladiador m

gladiator

[ˈglædieɪtər] ngladiateur m

gladiator

nGladiator m

gladiator

[ˈglædɪˌeɪtəʳ] ngladiatore m

gladiator

(ˈglӕdieitə) noun
in ancient Rome, a man trained to fight with other men or with animals for the amusement of spectators.
References in classic literature ?
Gladiators fought with gladiators and at times with warrior prisoners from many a distant land.
Some fine instinct that Rome must have bequeathed to us caused nearly every one to turn and look at them--there was a subtle feeling that two gladiators had met in the arena.
The mother and the son began to sway and struggle like gladiators.
We set our chair in the MIDST"--so saith their smirking unto me--"and as far from dying gladiators as from satisfied swine.
The two gladiators fell upon each other's neck, with floods of proud and happy tears; that other second embraced me; the surgeons, the orators, the undertakers, the police, everybody embraced, everybody congratulated, everybody cried, and the whole atmosphere was filled with praise and with joy unspeakable.
But let us come to Commodus, to whom it should have been very easy to hold the empire, for, being the son of Marcus, he had inherited it, and he had only to follow in the footsteps of his father to please his people and soldiers; but, being by nature cruel and brutal, he gave himself up to amusing the soldiers and corrupting them, so that he might indulge his rapacity upon the people; on the other hand, not maintaining his dignity, often descending to the theatre to compete with gladiators, and doing other vile things, little worthy of the imperial majesty, he fell into contempt with the soldiers, and being hated by one party and despised by the other, he was conspired against and was killed.
I feel as if I were back in the days of the Roman gladiators.
The gladiators in the lists of power feel, through all their frocks of force and simulation, the presence of worth.
His straight and perfect figure, muscled as the best of the ancient Roman gladiators must have been muscled, and yet with the soft and sinuous curves of a Greek god, told at a glance the wondrous combination of enormous strength with suppleness and speed.
Tall and well proportioned as an ancient gladiator, and muscular as a Spartan, he walked for a quarter of an hour without knowing where to direct his steps, actuated by the sole idea of getting away from the spot where if he lingered he knew that he would surely be taken.
The dying rattle of the valiant gladiator guided them amidst the ruins.
The Tin Woodman was usually a peaceful man, but when occasion required he could fight as fiercely as a Roman gladiator.