glost

glost

(ɡlɒst)
n
(Ceramics) the principal glaze used for pottery
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References in periodicals archive ?
At the beginning of the 1990s, the bubble economy burst in Japan and the so-called glost two decadesh followed.
The desired glost temperature and the possibility of cation release from the glaze affects the degree of usefulness of lead oxide as a flux.
Whitchurch Glost their top of the table division three clash with Brecon 3-1.
The glost firing causes individual pieces to shrink ("sinter") by about 14 percent, a phenomenon that must be calculated in making the molds.
When the dishes were completely dry, they were bisque fired to 1742 [degrees] F (950 [degrees] C) and eventually glost fired to 1976 [degrees] F (1080 [degrees] C).
It is significant that the corrector of the First Quarto, faced with the puzzle of the compositor's poorlie, leed, did not opt for led even though he was looking at the adjacent stage direction 'Enter Glost.
After more than two glost decadesh of stasis, marked by deflation and debt, Japan's hopes have been raised by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's determination to achieve economic revival with his gthree arrowsh.
During the Hu era China experienced a glost decadeh, as most of the reforms were postponed under his administration.
gFrozen outh of a good job Shimotsubo now 37 years old considers herself to be one of the country's glost generationh.
This is certainly good news and a positive trend for the nation following the two glost decadesh in which Japan suffered from stagnation caused by the lingering effects of the burst bubble economy.