glycaemia

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Related to Glycemic: hypoglycemic

glycaemia

(ˌɡlaɪˈsiːmɪə) or

glycemia

n
(Medicine) the presence of glucose in blood
[C20: from glyco- + -aemia]
glycaemic, glycemic adj
References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: To compare the results of thyroid function tests in euthyroid type 2 diabetic patients and normal healthy individuals on the basis of glycemic control.
Not only emotions directly affect glycemia; emotional stress may disrupt the individual's eating habits, exercise programs, and daily routine, thereby altering daily diabetes management and impairing glycemic control with a patient's emotional needs and problems is an equally important component which may be used in a positive sense to enhance treatment and thus become an important component of therapy.
Background: Clonidine activates peripheral [alpha]-2 adrenoreceptors and influences glycemic levels.
Study the categories of high and low glycemic food.
If you're trying to avoid diabetes, is it better to eat fewer carbs or to stick to carbs with a low glycemic index?
And while recent studies have pointed to two aggravating factors --foods with a high glycemic index and skim milk--whether dietary changes can help control acne remains up in the air, Andrea Zaenglein, MD, said.
Objectives: To determine the association between depression and glycemic control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus.
But to understand why requires knowledge of two things, the glycemic index and glycemic load of a particular food.
Nutritionists and other researchers in food and health sciences assemble information about the glycemic index and how it is used.
The scientific evidence does not support tight glycemic control as a means to prevent the complications of type 2 diabetes, even though most clinical practice guidelines, quality-of-care measures, quality improvement interventions, and academic and clinical statements unequivocally endorse tight glycemic control for that purpose, according to a report published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.
The investigators focused on the effect of tight glycemic control, as opposed to looser control, on 11 outcomes most important to patients: end-stage renal disease or the need for dialysis, renal death, blindness, clinical neuropathy, microalbuminuria, retinal photocoagulation, all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, nonfatal MI, fatal and nonfatal stroke, and peripheral vascular events or amputations.
The new research demonstrates that WEIGHTAIN significantly lowered both post-breakfast and post-lunch glycemic and insulin responses relative to the control.