glycaemic load

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glycaemic load

or

glycemic load

n
(Medicine) an index indicating the amount of carbohydrate contained in a specified serving of a particular food. It is calculated by multiplying the food's glycaemic index by its carbohydrate content in grams and then dividing by 100. Abbreviation: GL
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It has a low glycemic load compared to table sugar, and is made from sucralose (derived from sugarcane extract) and Maltitol (from wheat extract).
The sugar-free smoothie has a reduced glycemic load and is supplemented with soy protein, which makes it a protein-rich, nutritious breakfast option for people who usually skip breakfast.
So glycemic load is a better indicator of how a carbohydrate food will affect blood sugar.
003), available carbohydrate (total carbohydrate minus dietary fiber), percent energy from carbohydrate, and glycemic load (all P less than .
The researchers examined how fiber intake contributed to successful aging compared to other factors like total carb intake, glycemic index, glycemic load, and sugar intake, and it turns out that fiber has the biggest impact on your health into old age.
Dietary glycemic load is based on the glycemic index of a food and the amount of carbohydrates in a serving.
Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Lung Cancer Risk in Non-Hispanic Whites.
Effect on satiety, index and glycemic load of 3 nutritional bars with different composition of macronutrients in healthy young subjects).
But to understand why requires knowledge of two things, the glycemic index and glycemic load of a particular food.
Glycemic load (GL), a similar measure, also considers how much you're eating: Portion size still counts.
Out of all the factors researchers examined--which included a person's total carbohydrate intake, total fiber intake, glycemic index, glycemic load, and sugar intake--fiber made the biggest difference to what the researchers termed "successful aging.
However, the effect of sugar-sweetened beverage was independent of other known or suspected prognostic factors, and our results remained largely unchanged when we further adjusted for other energy balance factors, including BMI, physical activity, Western and prudent pattern diets, and dietary glycemic load.