liquorice

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li·quo·rice

 (lĭk′ər-ĭs, -ĭsh)
n. Chiefly British
Variant of licorice.

liquorice

(ˈlɪkərɪs; -ərɪʃ) or

licorice

n
1. (Plants) a perennial Mediterranean leguminous shrub, Glycyrrhiza glabra, having spikes of pale blue flowers and flat red-brown pods
2. (Cookery) the dried root of this plant, used as a laxative and in confectionery
3. (Pharmacology) the dried root of this plant, used as a laxative and in confectionery
4. (Cookery) a sweet having a liquorice flavour
[C13: via Anglo-Norman and Old French from Late Latin liquirītia, from Latin glycyrrhīza, from Greek glukurrhiza, from glukus sweet + rhiza root]

lic•o•rice

(ˈlɪk ər ɪʃ, ˈlɪk rɪʃ, ˈlɪk ə rɪs)

n.
1. a Eurasian plant, Glycyrrhiza glabra, of the legume family.
2. the sweet-tasting, dried root of this plant or an extract made from it, used in medicine, confectionery, etc.
3. a candy flavored with licorice root.
[1175–1225; Middle English lycorys < Anglo-French < Vulgar Latin *liquiritia, for Latin glycyrrhiza < Greek glykýrriza sweetroot (plant) =glyký(s) sweet + rhíza root1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.liquorice - deep-rooted coarse-textured plant native to the Mediterranean region having blue flowers and pinnately compound leavesliquorice - deep-rooted coarse-textured plant native to the Mediterranean region having blue flowers and pinnately compound leaves; widely cultivated in Europe for its long thick sweet roots
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Glycyrrhiza, Glycyrrhiza - sticky perennial Eurasian herbs
licorice root - root of licorice used in flavoring e.g. candy and liqueurs and medicines
2.liquorice - a black candy flavored with the dried root of the licorice plant
candy, confect - a rich sweet made of flavored sugar and often combined with fruit or nuts
Translations
عِرْق السّوس
lékořice
lakrids
igazi édesgyökér
lakkrís
saldymedis
lakrica
meyan kökü

liquorice

[ˈlɪkərɪs] Nregaliz m, orozuz m

liquorice

[ˈlɪkərɪs ˈlɪkərɪʃ] n (British)réglisse mfliquorice all-sorts npl (British)bonbons mpl au réglisse or à la réglisseliquor license n (US)licence f de débit de boissonsliquor store (US) nmagasin m de vins et spiritueux

liquorice

, licorice
n (= plant)Süßholz nt; (= root)Süßholzwurzel f; (= flavouring, sweetmeat)Lakritze f

liquorice

[ˈlɪkərɪs] nliquirizia

liquorice

(American) licorice (ˈlikəris) , ((American) -riʃ) noun
a plant with a sweet root, or a black, sticky type of sweet made from it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Isoliquiritigenin isolated from licorice Glycyrrhiza uralensis prevents 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neurons.
Effect of the extracts from Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch on the growth characteristics of human cell lines: Anti-tumor and immune activation activities.
Sijunzi decoction, which is also known as the "Four Gentlemen" decoction, consists of four types of herbs: Poria cocos, Radix ginseng, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Atractylodes macrocephala (9).
Effect of molybdenum on secondary metabolic process of glycyrrhizic acid in Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.
Zhang, Xu, and Li (2010) investigated the genetic variation among Glycyrrhiza uralensis ecotypes in northern China using AFLP markers.
FA (4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid) is extracted from some natural plants, such as Asafoetida giantfennel, Angelica sinensis, Cimicifuga racemosa, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, and Ligusticum chuanxiong, which have been employed as the traditional Chinese herbs to treat multiple diseases for several thousand years.
and the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch, which are proven to have acceptable curative effects in treating chronic pelvic inflammation through improving the blood viscosity and regulating T-lymphocytic sub groups (Zhao et al.
Hepatoprotective effect of licorice the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisher, in alcohol-induced fatty liver diseae.