Goidel


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Goidel

(ˈɡɔɪdəl)
n
(Peoples) a Celt who speaks a Goidelic language; Gael. Compare Brython
References in classic literature ?
The Goidels or Gaels were settled in the northern part of the island, which is now Scotland, and were the ancestors of the present Highland Scots.
Four attorneys have joined the real estate law firm Borah, Goldstein, Altschuler, Nahins & Goidel, P.
Lin and Xian worked with coauthors Wanyun Shao, assistant professor of geography at Auburn; Barry Keim, professor of climatology at LSU; and Kirby Goidel, professor of communication at A&M.
Puesto que el publico y los medios responden con mayor intensidad a la informacion economica negativa que a la positiva (Soroka, 2006; Goidel y Langley, 1995) la cobertura de los contextos de recesion ha gozado de mayor relevancia entre los trabajos de analisis.
Our audience is at the center of everything we do as a publisher, and in order to connect users with brands, a seamless user experience is key, said Melissa Goidel, Chief Revenue Officer, Refinery29, who shares her point-of-view in the report.
Back in the mists of time, Lleyn was partly or wholly inhabited by the Goidel Celts, or Gwyddelod in Welsh, from Ireland.
Goidel, Freeman, and Smentkowski discuss the Bill of Rights, presenting their project as a dispelling of common myths and drawing on the disciplines of history and political science to analyze its intent, application, and current role.
Por ello lo que estas publican importa, ya que de algun modo se afecta el proceso de formacion de opinion publica del electorado (Petersen, 2012; Feasby, 1997; Goidel y Shields, 1994).
The experimental studies summarized here (Blumberg and Cynamon 1999; Goidel et al.
com; Democratic Party pollster Anna Greenberg; and Scotte Keeter, director of survey research for the Pew Research Center, the eight chapters in this volume edited by Goidel (mass communication and political science, Louisiana State U.
He then moved to the landlord-tenant firm now known as Borah, Goldstein, Altschuler, Nahins and Goidel.
According to Donald Gross and Robert Goidel (2003), voters are no more trusting of the political process and no better informed as a result of disclosure.