golden ratio


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golden ratio

golden ratio

n
(Mathematics) the ratio of two lengths, equal in value to (1 + √5)/2, and given by b/a = (b + a)/b; it is the reciprocal of the golden section and also equal to (1 + golden section). Symbol: Φ Compare golden section
Translations
zlatý řez
nombre d’or
rapporto aureo
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References in periodicals archive ?
As one proceeds along the Fibonacci sequence, the ratio of successive numbers gets ever closer to the golden ratio.
Linking beer to Father's Day may be a cliche but this Williams Bros ale is good stuff at any time - and fully lives up to its golden ratio name (the perfect proportions loved by mathematicians).
The casing has a thickness of just 21mm at its thinnest point and the visual golden ratio achieved through the use of staggered lines make the Adora20/Adora22 look even slimmer.
Mathematically, 108 is a hyperfactoral of three, a Tetranacci number, a Harshad number, and a Self number, and it also results in the Golden Ratio.
Applied here, the golden ratio brings the desk, cabinet, and so on into conformity with the principles of rational beauty and classical majesty.
The author has designed this volume so that investors can apply these concepts, based on the Golden Ratio, for price projections and applications for time analysis.
One of my students then commented that topics like Pascal's Triangle, the Fibonacci Sequence, Golden Ratio, etc.
Other sections merely celebrate interesting theorems and concepts, including the bell Curve, Fibonacci and the golden ratio, and the numbers e and pi.
1-inch 1920 x 1200 high definition IPS display and 16:10 golden ratio to provide optimal viewing for gaming and high definition video.
Early artworks pared back to little except an assertion of the new name--for example, Signature Piece, 1962-63, a lithograph of a page of his passport bearing name and portrait, or the self-explanatorily titled Neon (Red) Signature, 1967--eventually establishing a graphic identity that includes the repeated use of the form of an apple, the typeface Futura, and the proportions of the golden ratio.
In 1854 the German scientist Zeising claimed that the ratio of a person's height to the height of their navel is in the same ratio as the Golden Ratio ([phi] = 1.
Since then, this never-ending, never-repeating, irrational number has been called the Golden Number or the Golden Ratio and linked to patterns ranging from the petal arrangement of roses to the composition of the "Mona Lisa.