euthanasia

(redirected from Good death)
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Related to Good death: euthanasia

eu·tha·na·sia

 (yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.

[Greek euthanasiā, a good death : eu-, eu- + thanatos, death.]

euthanasia

(ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə) or

euthanasy

n
(Medicine) the act of killing someone painlessly, esp to relieve suffering from an incurable illness. Also called: mercy killing
[C17: via New Latin from Greek: easy death, from eu- + thanatos death]

eu•tha•na•sia

(ˌyu θəˈneɪ ʒə, -ʒi ə, -zi ə)

n.
Also called mercy killing. the act of putting to death painlessly or allowing to die, as by withholding medical measures from a person or animal suffering from an incurable, esp. a painful, disease or condition.
[1640–50; < New Latin < Greek euthanasía easy death]

euthanasia

1. the act of putting to death without pain a person incurably ill or suffering great pain; mercy killing.
2. an easy, painless death. — euthanasic, adj.
See also: Killing
the deliberate killing of painfully ill or terminally ill people to put them out of their misery. Also called mercy killing.
See also: Death
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)
kill, putting to death, killing - the act of terminating a life

euthanasia

noun mercy killing, assisted suicide the emotive question of whether euthanasia should be legalized
Translations
إماتَه رَحيمَه
eutanasimedlidenhedsdrab
eutanázia
líknardráp
eutanazijaneskausmingas numarinimas
eitanāzija
eutanázia
ötenazitatlı ölüm

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] Neutanasia f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪziə] neuthanasie f

euthanasia

nEuthanasie f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] neutanasia

euthanasia

(juːθəˈneiziə) noun
the painless killing of someone who is suffering from a painful and incurable illness. Many old people would prefer euthanasia to the suffering they have to endure.

eu·tha·na·si·a

n. eutanasia, muerte infringida sin sufrimiento en casos de una enfermedad incurable.

euthanasia

n eutanasia
References in classic literature ?
And bear in mind what I am now about to say to you, for it will be of great use and comfort to you in time of trouble; it is, not to let your mind dwell on the adverse chances that may befall you; for the worst of all is death, and if it be a good death, the best of all is to die.
The letter emphasizes that to kill someone or to help someone to kill oneself is neither a good death ("euthanasia") nor a death aid ("by helping someone who dies") but a criminal act.
Writing in The Sunday Times, his son, Ben, said: "Dad died a good death, one that amplified the qualities we so admired while he lived.
The implementation of the bill … will give people hope and compassion, and that a good death will in fact be possible for people who are currently enduring difficult, difficult ends of life," Victoria's Health Minister Jill Hennessy said outside the state legislature in Melbourne after the lower house approved a law that had already cleared the upper house.
I'll have a good death session because that's the time I bowl in the match.
But the presentation that really caught my eye was one by Takis Panagiotopoulos on the good life (euzoia) and the good death (euthanasia).
Objective: To review the validity of the future of health and care of older people (TFHCOP), good death perception criteria in Muslim patients and health care providers in cultural background of Pakistan.
Brittany, however, taught her mother the one truth we most often avoid in such situations: A good death is part of a life well lived.
In the end, Neumann decides, "there is no good death.
To gain a better understanding, Neumann became a hospice volunteer and set out to discover what a good death is today.
For some patients, the relatives may decide to keep them in the hospital up to the very end, and it's time to prepare the patient and the family for what experts in palliative medicine would call a good death.
We don't talk about what might make a good death and it's something other countries, I believe, may be more open about.