Goode homolosine projection


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Related to Goode homolosine projection: Mollweide projection, Robinson projection

Goode homolosine projection

 (go͝od)
[After John Paul Goode (1862-1932), American geographer and cartographer.]
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Mapping raster imagery to the Goode homolosine projection.
Unfortunately, the commercial software tools we used for re-projection could not generate the Goode homolosine projection from the Lambert azimuthal source or from an equivalent in geographic coordinates.
Imagine) and some original programming for the Goode homolosine projection (unavailable in commercial software at the time of this research), the 12 quadrilaterals were projected to four global projections using a standard parallel and central meridian of zero degrees: Lambert's equal-area cylindrical, Mollweide, Robinson, and the Goode homolosine (which is a combination of the sinusoidal projection at latitudes below 40 [degrees] 40' and the Mollweide projection at higher latitudes) interrupted by oceans.
To better preserve areas, the interrupted Goode homolosine projection has been recommended for global-raster GIS databases because it uses six lobes, each with its own central meridian (resulting in 12 regions for implementation), and can be composited into a single world view (Steinwand 1994).
The Goode homolosine projection is currently not available in most commercial GIS packages.
The resulting Goode homolosine projection is most common in its interrupted form.