Goose quill

a large feather or quill of a goose; also, a pen made from it.

See also: Goose

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References in classic literature ?
Then everyone saw that it was a blunted gray goose shaft, with a fine scroll, about the thickness of a goose quill, tied near to its head.
If these dragons were being individually painted by hand with a sharpened goose quill I might agree, but in the computerised age you should be able to choose from a selection on your licence application form and when that form is scanned, it would automatically print your preference onto your licence.
They had to have a reed or a goose quill - both of which were expensive to buy and difficult to use.
It was a joy to handle and despite having been fractured some four inches from the tip - and someone had fitted a goose quill to cover the fracture - a fault which I failed to notice in my hurry to buy it, I really treasured it.
In "The Mason" the title character "drew a diagram / on rice papyrus / with a goose quill / and octopus ink.
AELRIC adjusted his fingerless gloves and carefully carved a neat nib on a fresh goose quill.
Members were invited to take part in a draw for these loaves by signing their names using a goose quill pen and soot ink.
Humans have been creating graffiti ever since we moved indoors to live in caves, and as soon as someone split the end of a goose quill we became journal writers.
Back in the days before insurance companies and guideline-drawing super subcommittees, when solo practitioners walked the Earth, a physician might scratch out a few of his observations with a goose quill to supplement his memory, if he wrote anything at all.
In other words we wanted to see ink on paper,or even vellum or parchment, whether written by goose quill,ballpoint,fountain pen, typewriter or electronic printer, although,obviously a typed entry would have been given preference for clarity.
The ingredients are the finest, including jam made from a 14th century French recipe which involves taking the seeds from redcurrants using a goose quill.
Usually the women painted the designs on the pots--mainly floral motifs but also roosters, chickens, storks, geese, fish, rabbits, and customized inscriptions of people's names or popular sayings--using a barolet, a small, handheld ceramic paint pot with a goose quill attached to guide the glaze onto the pot.