Gothic


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Related to Gothic: Gothic language
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Gothic
façade of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame
Reims, France

Goth·ic

 (gŏth′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to the Goths or their language.
b. Germanic; Teutonic.
2. Of or relating to the Middle Ages; medieval.
3.
a. Of or relating to an architectural style prevalent in western Europe from the 12th through the 15th century and characterized by pointed arches, rib vaulting, and a developing emphasis on verticality and the impression of height.
b. Of or relating to an architectural style derived from medieval Gothic.
4. Of or relating to painting, sculpture, or other art forms prevalent in northern Europe from the 12th through the 15th century.
5. often gothic Of or relating to a style of fiction that emphasizes the grotesque, mysterious, and desolate.
6. gothic Barbarous; crude.
n.
1. The extinct East Germanic language of the Goths.
2. Gothic art or architecture.
3. often gothic Printing
4. A novel in a style emphasizing the grotesque, mysterious, and desolate.

Goth′i·cal·ly adv.
Word History: The expression Gothic romance unites two major influences in the development of European culture, the Roman Empire and the Germanic tribes, such as the Goths, that invaded it. Gothic originally meant "having to do with the Goths or their language," but its meaning eventually came to encompass all the qualities associated with Germanic culture, especially the Germanic culture dominant during the medieval period after the fall of Rome. This period became a subject of popular literature in the 18th century, beginning with Horace Walpole's novel The Castle of Otranto, a Gothic Story (1765). From this work of Walpole's, filled with scenes of terror and gloom in a medieval setting, descended the modern literary genre of the gothic romance.

Gothic

(ˈɡɒθɪk)
adj
1. (Architecture) denoting, relating to, or resembling the style of architecture that was used in W Europe from the 12th to the 16th centuries, characterized by the lancet arch, the ribbed vault, and the flying buttress. See also Gothic Revival
2. (Art Movements) of or relating to the style of sculpture, painting, or other arts as practised in W Europe from the 12th to the 16th centuries
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements) (sometimes not capital) of or relating to a literary style characterized by gloom, the grotesque, and the supernatural, popular esp in the late 18th century. When used of modern literature, films, etc, sometimes spelt: Gothick
4. (Historical Terms) of, relating to, or characteristic of the Goths or their language
5. (sometimes not capital) primitive and barbarous in style, behaviour, etc
6. (Historical Terms) of or relating to the Middle Ages
7. (Music, other) another word for Goth4
n
8. (Architecture) Gothic architecture or art
9. (Languages) the extinct language of the ancient Goths, known mainly from fragments of a translation of the Bible made in the 4th century by Bishop Wulfila. See also East Germanic
10. (Historical Terms) the extinct language of the ancient Goths, known mainly from fragments of a translation of the Bible made in the 4th century by Bishop Wulfila. See also East Germanic
11. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) Also called (esp Brit): black letter the family of heavy script typefaces
12. (Music, other) another word for Goth3
ˈGothically adv

goth•ic

(ˈgɒθ ɪk)

adj.
1. (usu. cap.)
a. of or pertaining to a style of architecture prevalent in W Europe from the mid-12th to the 16th century, characterized by pointed arches, ribbed vaulting, flying buttresses, rich ornamentation, and a progressive lightening of structure.
b. of or pertaining to a style of architecture imitating Gothic forms and motifs.
2. (cap.) of or pertaining to the Goths or their language.
3. (usu. cap.) of or pertaining to the Middle Ages; medieval.
4. (sometimes cap.) barbarous or crude.
5. (often cap.) of or pertaining to a style of literature characterized by a gloomy setting, mysterious, sinister, or violent events, and, in contemporary fiction, an imperiled heroine.
n.
6. (usu. cap.) the arts, crafts, or architecture of the Gothic period.
7. (cap.) the extinct East Germanic language of the Goths, preserved esp. in Ulfilas' 4th-century translation of the Bible. Abbr.: Go
8. (often cap.) a novel, play, film, etc., in the gothic style.
9. (often cap.)
a. a square-cut printing type without serifs or hairlines.
[1605–15; < Late Latin]
goth′i•cal•ly, adv.
goth′ic•ness n.

Gothicism, Gothic

the general term employed to denote the several phases of European architecture in the period 1100-1530 that employ the pointed arch, or their imitations.
See also: Architecture

gothic

A style characterized by gloom, the grotesque and supernatural, popular in the late eighteenth century and revived in the twentieth; often set in ruined castles, abbeys, or old houses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gothic - extinct East Germanic language of the ancient Goths; the only surviving record being fragments of a 4th-century translation of the Bible by Bishop Ulfilas
East Germanic, East Germanic language - an extinct branch of the Germanic languages
2.gothic - a heavy typeface in use from 15th to 18th centuriesGothic - a heavy typeface in use from 15th to 18th centuries
font, fount, typeface, face, case - a specific size and style of type within a type family
3.gothic - a style of architecture developed in northern France that spread throughout Europe between the 12th and 16th centuriesGothic - a style of architecture developed in northern France that spread throughout Europe between the 12th and 16th centuries; characterized by slender vertical piers and counterbalancing buttresses and by vaulting and pointed arches
architectural style, style of architecture, type of architecture - architecture as a kind of art form
English-Gothic, English-Gothic architecture, perpendicular style, perpendicular - a Gothic style in 14th and 15th century England; characterized by vertical lines and a four-centered (Tudor) arch and fan vaulting
Adj.1.Gothic - characteristic of the style of type commonly used for printing German
2.Gothic - of or relating to the language of the ancient Goths; "the Gothic Bible translation"
3.Gothic - of or relating to the Goths; "Gothic migrations"
4.gothic - as if belonging to the Middle Ages; old-fashioned and unenlightened; "a medieval attitude toward dating"
nonmodern - not modern; of or characteristic of an earlier time
5.gothic - characterized by gloom and mystery and the grotesque; "gothic novels like `Frankenstein'"
literature - creative writing of recognized artistic value
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; "a strange exaltation that was indefinable"; "a strange fantastical mind"; "what a strange sense of humor she has"
Translations
gotičkigotskigotski jezik
gothicGotisch

Gothic

[ˈgɒθɪk]
A. ADJ [race] → godo (Archit, Typ) → gótico; [novel etc] → gótico
B. N (Archit, Ling etc) → gótico m

Gothic

[ˈgɒθɪk] adjgothique

Gothic

adj
people, language, script, letteringgotisch
(Art) → gotisch; the Gothic agedas Zeitalter der Gotik; Gothic Revival (Archit) → Neugotik f; Gothic Revival architectureneugotische Architektur
(Liter: = horror) → schaurig; a Gothic storyeine Schauergeschichte; Gothic (horror) novelSchauerroman m
n
(Archit) → Gotik f
(= language)Gotisch nt
(Typ) → Gotisch nt; (US) → Grotesk f

Gothic

[ˈgɒθɪk] adjgotico/a
References in classic literature ?
Toward the end of April, the billboards, which I watched anxiously in those days, bloomed out one morning with gleaming white posters on which two names were impressively printed in blue Gothic letters: the name of an actress of whom I had often heard, and the name `Camille.
They all went together up to the quaint little Gothic church of Our Lady of Lourdes, gleaming all brown and yellow with paint in the sun's glare.
Its whole visible exterior was ornamented with quaint figures, conceived in the grotesqueness of a Gothic fancy, and drawn or stamped in the glittering plaster, composed of lime, pebbles, and bits of glass, with which the woodwork of the walls was overspread.
And since in this famous fishery, each mate or headsman, like a Gothic Knight of old, is always accompanied by his boat-steerer or harpooneer, who in certain conjunctures provides him with a fresh lance, when the former one has been badly twisted, or elbowed in the assault; and moreover, as there generally subsists between the two, a close intimacy and friendliness; it is therefore but meet, that in this place we set down who the Pequod's harpooneers were, and to what headsman each of them belonged.
They mostly lie like the great knobbed blocks on a Gothic spire, forming solid courses of heavy masonry.
When, early in a summer afternoon, we have been shaking the dust of the village from the skirts of our garments, making haste past those houses with purely Doric or Gothic fronts, which have such an air of repose about them, my companion whispers that probably about these times their occupants are all gone to bed.
They go to the university to put a mansard roof on their whole general education; but the German student already has his mansard roof, so he goes there to add a steeple in the nature of some specialty, such as a particular branch of law, or diseases of the eye, or special study of the ancient Gothic tongues.
In one direction the tiny Gothic town-hall of old Aldborough -- once the center of the vanished port and borough -- now stands, fronting the modern villas close on the margin of the sea.
The ancient tower of a church, whose gruff old bell was always peeping slily down at Scrooge out of a Gothic window in the wall, became invisible, and struck the hours and quarters in the clouds, with tremulous vibrations afterwards as if its teeth were chattering in its frozen head up there.
I highly commended it, I think it was the smallest house I ever saw; with the queerest gothic windows (by far the greater part of them sham), and a gothic door, almost too small to get in at.
It is my comfort, that errors of this kind will escape the general class of readers, and that I may share in the ill-deserved applause of those architects, who, in their modern Gothic, do not hesitate to introduce, without rule or method, ornaments proper to different styles and to different periods of the art.
There are few of us who have not sometimes wakened before dawn, either after one of those dreamless nights that make us almost enamoured of death, or one of those nights of horror and misshapen joy, when through the chambers of the brain sweep phantoms more terrible than reality itself, and instinct with that vivid life that lurks in all grotesques, and that lends to Gothic art its enduring vitality, this art being, one might fancy, especially the art of those whose minds have been troubled with the malady of reverie.