Gothic

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Goth·ic

 (gŏth′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to the Goths or their language.
b. Germanic; Teutonic.
2. Of or relating to the Middle Ages; medieval.
3.
a. Of or relating to an architectural style prevalent in western Europe from the 12th through the 15th century and characterized by pointed arches, rib vaulting, and an emphasis on verticality and the impression of height.
b. Of or relating to an architectural style derived from medieval Gothic.
4. Of or relating to painting, sculpture, or other art forms prevalent in northern Europe from the 12th through the 15th century.
5. often gothic Of or relating to a style of fiction that emphasizes the grotesque, mysterious, and desolate.
6. gothic Barbarous; crude.
n.
1. The extinct East Germanic language of the Goths.
2. Gothic art or architecture.
3. often gothic Printing
4. A novel in a style emphasizing the grotesque, mysterious, and desolate.

Goth′i·cal·ly adv.
Word History: The expression Gothic romance unites two major influences in the development of European culture, the Roman Empire and the Germanic tribes, such as the Goths, that invaded it. Gothic originally meant "having to do with the Goths or their language," but its meaning eventually came to encompass all the qualities associated with Germanic culture, especially the Germanic culture dominant during the medieval period after the fall of Rome. This period became a subject of popular literature in the 18th century, beginning with Horace Walpole's novel The Castle of Otranto, a Gothic Story (1765). From this work of Walpole's, filled with scenes of terror and gloom in a medieval setting, descended the modern literary genre of the gothic romance.

Gothic

(ˈɡɒθɪk)
adj
1. (Architecture) denoting, relating to, or resembling the style of architecture that was used in W Europe from the 12th to the 16th centuries, characterized by the lancet arch, the ribbed vault, and the flying buttress. See also Gothic Revival
2. (Art Movements) of or relating to the style of sculpture, painting, or other arts as practised in W Europe from the 12th to the 16th centuries
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements) (sometimes not capital) of or relating to a literary style characterized by gloom, the grotesque, and the supernatural, popular esp in the late 18th century. When used of modern literature, films, etc, sometimes spelt: Gothick
4. (Historical Terms) of, relating to, or characteristic of the Goths or their language
5. (sometimes not capital) primitive and barbarous in style, behaviour, etc
6. (Historical Terms) of or relating to the Middle Ages
7. (Music, other) another word for Goth4
n
8. (Architecture) Gothic architecture or art
9. (Languages) the extinct language of the ancient Goths, known mainly from fragments of a translation of the Bible made in the 4th century by Bishop Wulfila. See also East Germanic
10. (Historical Terms) the extinct language of the ancient Goths, known mainly from fragments of a translation of the Bible made in the 4th century by Bishop Wulfila. See also East Germanic
11. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) Also called (esp Brit): black letter the family of heavy script typefaces
12. (Music, other) another word for Goth3
ˈGothically adv

goth•ic

(ˈgɒθ ɪk)

adj.
1. (usu. cap.)
a. of or pertaining to a style of architecture prevalent in W Europe from the mid-12th to the 16th century, characterized by pointed arches, ribbed vaulting, flying buttresses, rich ornamentation, and a progressive lightening of structure.
b. of or pertaining to a style of architecture imitating Gothic forms and motifs.
2. (cap.) of or pertaining to the Goths or their language.
3. (usu. cap.) of or pertaining to the Middle Ages; medieval.
4. (sometimes cap.) barbarous or crude.
5. (often cap.) of or pertaining to a style of literature characterized by a gloomy setting, mysterious, sinister, or violent events, and, in contemporary fiction, an imperiled heroine.
n.
6. (usu. cap.) the arts, crafts, or architecture of the Gothic period.
7. (cap.) the extinct East Germanic language of the Goths, preserved esp. in Ulfilas' 4th-century translation of the Bible. Abbr.: Go
8. (often cap.) a novel, play, film, etc., in the gothic style.
9. (often cap.)
a. a square-cut printing type without serifs or hairlines.
[1605–15; < Late Latin]
goth′i•cal•ly, adv.
goth′ic•ness n.

Gothicism, Gothic

the general term employed to denote the several phases of European architecture in the period 1100-1530 that employ the pointed arch, or their imitations.
See also: Architecture

gothic

A style characterized by gloom, the grotesque and supernatural, popular in the late eighteenth century and revived in the twentieth; often set in ruined castles, abbeys, or old houses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gothic - extinct East Germanic language of the ancient Goths; the only surviving record being fragments of a 4th-century translation of the Bible by Bishop Ulfilas
East Germanic, East Germanic language - an extinct branch of the Germanic languages
2.gothic - a heavy typeface in use from 15th to 18th centuriesGothic - a heavy typeface in use from 15th to 18th centuries
font, fount, typeface, face, case - a specific size and style of type within a type family
3.gothic - a style of architecture developed in northern France that spread throughout Europe between the 12th and 16th centuriesGothic - a style of architecture developed in northern France that spread throughout Europe between the 12th and 16th centuries; characterized by slender vertical piers and counterbalancing buttresses and by vaulting and pointed arches
architectural style, style of architecture, type of architecture - architecture as a kind of art form
English-Gothic, English-Gothic architecture, perpendicular style, perpendicular - a Gothic style in 14th and 15th century England; characterized by vertical lines and a four-centered (Tudor) arch and fan vaulting
Adj.1.Gothic - characteristic of the style of type commonly used for printing German
2.Gothic - of or relating to the language of the ancient Goths; "the Gothic Bible translation"
3.Gothic - of or relating to the Goths; "Gothic migrations"
4.gothic - as if belonging to the Middle Ages; old-fashioned and unenlightened; "a medieval attitude toward dating"
nonmodern - not modern; of or characteristic of an earlier time
5.gothic - characterized by gloom and mystery and the grotesque; "gothic novels like `Frankenstein'"
literature - creative writing of recognized artistic value
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; "a strange exaltation that was indefinable"; "a strange fantastical mind"; "what a strange sense of humor she has"
Translations
gotičkigotskigotski jezik
gothicGotisch

Gothic

[ˈgɒθɪk]
A. ADJ [race] → godo (Archit, Typ) → gótico; [novel etc] → gótico
B. N (Archit, Ling etc) → gótico m

Gothic

[ˈgɒθɪk] adjgothique

Gothic

adj
people, language, script, letteringgotisch
(Art) → gotisch; the Gothic agedas Zeitalter der Gotik; Gothic Revival (Archit) → Neugotik f; Gothic Revival architectureneugotische Architektur
(Liter: = horror) → schaurig; a Gothic storyeine Schauergeschichte; Gothic (horror) novelSchauerroman m
n
(Archit) → Gotik f
(= language)Gotisch nt
(Typ) → Gotisch nt; (US) → Grotesk f

Gothic

[ˈgɒθɪk] adjgotico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
In these senses, Blake attests to the notion, exemplified in discourses regarding the incompatibility of slavery and urbanity registered in Mann's Gothicized depiction of Cuba, that urban slavery endangers whites.
The church stands as a marvel in structural engineering skills and artistic creativity with its Gothicized pulpit and confessionals, silver frontals, frescoes and ornaments, delicately wrought ironworks and chandeliers, its twin spires with belfry, and the intricate paintings on colored glass which was freshly introduced to the Philippines by an international multi-awarded studio in Brussels, Belgium," the National Museum said in a statement.
As my list of themes shows, there is no literary motive that cannot be gothicized, that is, read as contemplating its own insufficiency, exclusion, or erasure.
39) But if Byron's Giaour can be said to participate in this process, and Gamer argues that it does, one must bear in mind that it is not simply gothic matter that Byron must salvage, but gothicized oriental material.
These Gothicized places, projected into the past, feature the kind of socio-political world that could pose a threat to the stability of 'normal' modernity: their populations suffer from the predations of despots with an unnatural power incompatible with democracies judged to be superior on the basis of the Enlightenment ideal of rationality and equality that were understood to have founded them.
What these texts have in common is their depiction of Wales or the Welsh as Gothicized in some way, be it through depictions of haunted landscapes, family curses, or ancient terrors come back to roost.
Its recent conference, organised by Donna Mae Linton, and held in Dublin's ancient Christ Church cathedral (spectacularly Gothicized by Street in 1878) attracted over 60 people.
Although Hearn and Carter are known primarily as fiction writers, it is their Gothicized travel writing that offers "transformations" to the conventions of both the Gothic and travel writing, incorporating in nonfiction travel pieces from Japan elements of the macabre and the supernatural, as well as a fascination with death, grave scenes, shape shifters and ghostly revenants.
Teresa Goddu, for example, reads The Blithedale Romance (1852) as a Gothicized unveiling of capitalism that spills from the manipulative parlor tricks of mesmerism into the increasingly commercialized sphere of literature.
The anxieties involved in this process are reflected in the heightened, gothicized descriptions of historic cannibalism in nineteenth-century writing.
On the contrary, it was the product of several newly invented cultural practices and technologies, and I would claim that some of those technologies can be seen in the development of the highly Gothicized phantasmagoria, the melodrama, the chapbook, and the opera, all of which performed their cultural work by transforming that "background" through iteration and repetition.
Dryasdust pedant who deals in surfaces while the Spirit suggests the overly emotional, Gothicized antiquarianism of a figure like Walpole.