Grand days

(Eng. Law) certain days in the terms which are observed as holidays in the inns of court and chancery (Candlemas, Ascension, St. John Baptist's, and All Saints' Days); called also Dies non juridici.

See also: Grand

References in classic literature ?
But she has one thing in the drawer which she can venture to wear to-day, because she can hang it on the chain of dark-brown berries which she has been used to wear on grand days, with a tiny flat scent-bottle at the end of it tucked inside her frock; and she must put on her brown berries-- her neck would look so unfinished without it.
they were grand days, those deep, full days, when our coming life, like an unseen organ, pealed strange, yearnful music in our ears, and our young blood cried out like a war-horse for the battle.
This is Grand Day, and we are all topsy-turvy in consequence.
But not a drop ever fell, and it finished a grand day, and a lovely night after it.
There's a Drawing Room, or a grand day in the Park, or a Show, or a Fete, or what you like.
Created in the late Victorian era as a grand hotel for tourists arriving on the Orient Express, the Pera Palace was--through its grand days and long into decline--a meeting place for foreigners from all over the world with interests in the region.
Highly recommended for any boxing enthusiast curious about the grand days when Muhammad Ali reigned in the ring.
SIX-YEAR-OLD Katie's thoughts on her grand days out: "I liked it because I learned lots of nice things, like how to hold a bird properly - I had to give it to Mum for a while because my arm started aching.
However, Tatum still laments the passing of a historical monument to the grand days of non-league soccer - North Shields sold their ground to developers when times got tight - and inevitably the day arrived in 1992 when the construction company applied to demolish the stands to make way for houses.
These are some of the pictures you sent us from your grand days out at Wembley.
Resuming in 1932 the story that Moorhouse's 1993 novel, Grand Days, covered from 1926 to 1930, Dark Palace chronicles the life and times of a young and ambitious Australian woman who aims, through her service to the League of Nations in Geneva, to become part of a new breed of international citizens who will not so much transcend nationality as expand it in the service of world stability and prosperity.
It is being promoted as a throwback to the grand days of the original Penn Station, complete with sweeping glass vistas and a dramatic use of space.