Gravesend


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Graves·end

 (grāvz′ĕnd′)
A town of southeast England on the Thames River east of London. Is is known as "the Gateway to the Port of London." Pocahontas is buried here.

Gravesend

(ˌɡreɪvzˈɛnd)
n
(Placename) a river port in SE England, in NW Kent on the Thames. Pop: 53 045 (2001)

Graves•end

(ˌgreɪvzˈɛnd)

n.
a seaport in NW Kent, in SE England, on the Thames River. 94,300.
References in classic literature ?
These are two Yarmouth boatmen - very kind, good people - who are relations of my nurse, and have come from Gravesend to see me.
I had always proposed to myself to get him well down the river in the boat; certainly well beyond Gravesend, which was a critical place for search or inquiry if suspicion were afoot.
The houses of Gravesend crowd upon the shore with an effect of confusion as if they had tumbled down haphazard from the top of the hill at the back.
This time they were to embark on board a large vessel which awaited them at Gravesend, and Charles II.
I wired to Gravesend and learned that she had passed some time ago, and as the wind is easterly I have no doubt that she is now past the Goodwins and not very far from the Isle of Wight.
All the young clerks are madly in love, and according to their various degrees, pine for bliss with the beloved object, at Margate, Ramsgate, or Gravesend.
ON a summer's morning, between thirty and forty years ago, two girls were crying bitterly in the cabin of an East Indian passenger ship, bound outward, from Gravesend to Bombay.
If he'd been away in the barge I'd ha' thought nothin'; for many a time a job has taken him as far as Gravesend, and then if there was much doin' there he might ha' stayed over.
The air was dark above Gravesend, and farther back still seemed condensed into a mournful gloom, brooding mo- tionless over the biggest, and the greatest, town on earth.
We saw Tilbury Fort and remembered the Spanish Armada, Gravesend, Woolwich, and Greenwich-- places which I had heard of even in my country.
He informed me that the Indians had certainly been passengers on board his vessel--but as far as Gravesend only.
The third person who got out was a hawker from Gravesend well known to the porters.