gravestone

(redirected from Gravestones)
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Related to Gravestones: Tombstones

grave·stone

 (grāv′stōn′)
n.
A stone placed over a grave as a marker; a tombstone.

gravestone

(ˈɡreɪvˌstəʊn)
n
a stone marking a grave and usually inscribed with the name and dates of the person buried

grave•stone

(ˈgreɪvˌstoʊn)

n.
a stone, usually inscribed, marking a grave.
[1175–1225]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gravestone - a stone that is used to mark a gravegravestone - a stone that is used to mark a grave
tomb, grave - a place for the burial of a corpse (especially beneath the ground and marked by a tombstone); "he put flowers on his mother's grave"
monument, memorial - a structure erected to commemorate persons or events
stone - building material consisting of a piece of rock hewn in a definite shape for a special purpose; "he wanted a special stone to mark the site"

gravestone

noun headstone, stone, monument, tombstone He was buried in the local cemetery, with just a simple gravestone.
Translations
شَاهِدُ القَبْرشاهِد، بَلاطَة ضَريح
náhrobní kámen
gravsten
GrabsteinLeichenstein
hautakivi
nadgrobna ploča
legsteinn
墓石
묘비
nagrobni kamen
gravsten
หินสลักหน้าหลุมฝังศพ
bia mộ

gravestone

[ˈgreɪvstəʊn] Nlápida f (sepulcral)

gravestone

[ˈgreɪvstəʊn] npierre f tombale

gravestone

[ˈgreɪvˌstəʊn] npietra tombale, lapide f

grave1

(greiv) noun
a plot of ground, or the hole dug in it, in which a dead person is buried. He laid flowers on the grave.
ˈgravedigger noun
a person whose job is digging graves.
ˈgravestone noun
a stone placed at a grave on which the dead person's name etc is written.
ˈgraveyard noun
a place where the dead are buried.

gravestone

شَاهِدُ القَبْر náhrobní kámen gravsten Grabstein ταφόπλακα lápida hautakivi pierre tombale nadgrobna ploča lapide 墓石 묘비 grafsteen gravstøtte nagrobek lápide tumular надгробный камень gravsten หินสลักหน้าหลุมฝังศพ mezar taşı bia mộ 墓碑
References in classic literature ?
Dimmesdale encountered the eldest female member of his church, a most pious and exemplary old dame, poor, widowed, lonely, and with a heart as full of reminiscences about her dead husband and children, and her dead friends of long ago, as a burial-ground is full of storied gravestones.
I judge so from the fact that hundreds of old gravestones have been removed from the graves and placed against the inner walls of the cemetery.
It was a misty afternoon, but the February sun shone dimly, and we could just distinguish the two fir-trees in the yard, and the sparely-scattered gravestones.
and all the gravestones in the churchyard--it was a large churchyard that they were in--looking on like ghosts in white, while the church tower itself looked on Eke the ghost of a monstrous giant.
She continued to stand, however, looking at the placid churchyard with the long shadows of the gravestones across the bright green hillocks, and at the glowing autumn colours of the Rectory trees beyond.
Faithful to no race after the manner of the kindly earth, receiving no impress from valour and toil and self- sacrifice, recognising no finality of dominion, the sea has never adopted the cause of its masters like those lands where the victorious nations of mankind have taken root, rocking their cradles and setting up their gravestones.
And close at hand came the village: the small church, with its red-tiled roof, looking humble even among the faded half-timbered houses; the old green gravestones with nettles round them; nothing fresh and bright but the children, opening round eyes at the swift post-chaise; nothing noisy and busy but the gaping curs of mysterious pedigree.
And there really was a churchyard outside under some cloisters, for I saw the gravestones from the staircase window.
Beyond, the shore, strewed over with these rocks like gravestones, ascended, in form of an amphitheater among mastic-trees and cactus, a sort of small town, full of smoke, confused noises, and terrified movements.
But as some of them were united into extended groups and as the interest of the congregation deepened, the churches began to seem too small and inconvenient, the excited audiences forgot the proper reverence, and the performances were transferred to the churchyard, and then, when the gravestones proved troublesome, to the market place, the village-green, or any convenient field.
Hard by, was a little churchyard; not crowded with tall unsightly gravestones, but full of humble mounds, covered with fresh turf and moss: beneath which, the old people of the village lay at rest.
They admired everything--the old grey porch, the mullioned windows, the venerable gravestones dotting the green churchyard, the ancient tower, the very weathercock; the brown thatched roofs of cottage, barn, and homestead, peeping from among the trees; the stream that rippled by the distant water-mill; the blue Welsh mountains far away.