Gravettian


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Gravettian

(ɡrəˈvɛtɪən)
adj
(Archaeology) of, referring to, or characteristic of an Upper Palaeolithic culture, characterized esp by small pointed blades with blunt backs
[C20: from La Gravette on the Dordogne, France]

Gravettian

Belonging to a Paleolithic culture in southwestern France in which people made small, pointed stone blades with blunt backs.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Paleolithic dog skulls at the Gravettian Predmosti site, the Czech Republic.
2013): "Bipolar knapping in Gravettian occupations at El Palomar Rockshelter (Yeste, Southeastern Spain)", Journal of Anthropological Research, 69, pp.
Objective: The PALMOBI project investigates Early Upper Palaeolithic (EUP) hunter-gatherer interactions with their environment at micro- and macro-regional scales under variable ecological conditions through the integrative use of cutting-edge interdisciplinary methodologies and their application to the archaeological record of the Aurignacian and the Gravettian across two contrasting regions (temperate Belgium & continental Romania).
Around thirty thousand years ago, in the epoch of the Gravettian culture, man sets up ceremonial burials (the "polished" skulls Homo sapiens idaltu discovered in Ethiopia are to be considered as the practice of ritual murder).
2002): The Gravettian occipital bone from the site of Malladetes (Barx, Valencia, Spain).
The art of ceramics for purposes other than storage can be traced as far as the ancient goddess figurines, dated back to the Gravettian Period (29,000-25,000 B.
They focus on the Early Upper Palaeolithic, encompass a wide region within Central Eastern Europe, and concentrate on the early phases of the Aurignacian and the transition to the Gravettian.
The artefacts made by humans at the site allowed archaeologists to tie the ancient people to a cultural tradition known as the Gravettian.
2002): Portrait of the Artist as a Child: the Gravettian Human Skeleton from the Abrigo do Lagar Velho and Its Archaeological Context.
The I-haplogroup is thought to have been introduced into Europe by the Gravettian culture, which migrated from the Middle East about 25,000 years ago.
From the early Eocene primates and Miocene apes to the later pioneers of Gravettian and, finally, farming cultures that ultimately took Europe and Asia by storm, Finlayson explores the related fates of several hominid forms.
There have never been female figures among sculptures found in this region and this figure, with exaggerated female characteristics, predates the famous Gravettian Venuses by more than 5,000 years.