gray fox

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Related to Gray foxes: Urocyon cinereoargenteus

gray fox

n.
Any of several foxes having grizzled fur on the back and sides, especially Urocyon cinereoargenteus of southern North America, Central America, and northern South America, which has a black stripe down the tail and, unlike the red fox, climbs trees.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gray fox - dark grey American foxgray fox - dark grey American fox; from Central America through southern United States
fox - alert carnivorous mammal with pointed muzzle and ears and a bushy tail; most are predators that do not hunt in packs
genus Urocyon, Urocyon - grey foxes
References in periodicals archive ?
2003) to survey for gray foxes, coyotes, and bobcats in southern Illinois, and compared detection rates among survey methods and species.
Activity patterns of gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) may vary with temperature, season, activity of prey, or harassment from humans or other predators (Cypher, 2003).
For example, to make Fox Games, 1989--an image of a room-size installation now on long-term view at the Denver Art Museum--Skoglund created an eye-popping scene featuring a group of twenty-eight cast-resin gray foxes scampering through an unrelentingly red restaurant set.
Both Red-faced Warbler and Yellow-eyed Junco nests were depredated by gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), cliff chipmunks (Tamias dorsalis), and Steller's Jays (Cyanocitta stelleri).
Hunter prepared taxidermy mounts of skunks and of gray foxes, an animal about the same size but a distinctly different shape.
Gray foxes can climb trees to escape from their enemies.
In the literature, there are reports of predation of fox species by Golden Eagles, including Channel Island gray foxes (Urocyon littoralis) and the swift fox (Vulpes velox) of the Great Plains.
Gray foxes, likely carried on storm debris, reached the northern Channel Islands as early as 16,000 years ago.
A survey of anthropogenic ecological factors potentially affecting gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) in rural a residential area.
There are the black bears in the San Gabriel and Santa Susanas, deer herds, mountain lions, gray foxes and racoons, Skei said.
Diablo includes coastal black-tailed deer, gray foxes, bobcats, mountain lions, badgers, and coyotes, as well as the red-legged frog and the rare Alameda whipsnake.
The 2010 Game-Take and Furtaker Surveys estimated that furtakers took 125,423 raccoons (112,550 in 2009); 58,296 muskrats (63,998); 54,661 red foxes (37,418); 36,188 opossums (37,270); 26,658 coyotes (30,386); 15,691 gray foxes (13,793); 8,935 skunks (8,314); and 8,204 mink (7,261).