Great sea


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the Mediterranean sea. In Chaucer both the Black and the Mediterranean seas are so called.

See also: Great

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We did so; nor were we disappointed, for at last after a pleasant journey--and what journey would not be pleasant after the hardships we had endured among the peaks of the Mountains of the Clouds--we came upon a broad flood that rushed majestically onward in the di-rection of the great sea we had seen from the snowy slopes of the mountains.
Their cities stretched from a great sea under the rising sun to a great sea into which the sun descends at night to cool his flaming brow.
Thus, in the midst of this great sea, Captain Nemo's life was passing, even to his grave, which he had prepared in one of its deepest abysses.
A great sea chest stood open in the center, and allround upon the carpet were little piles of jerseys, oil-skins, books, sextant boxes, instruments, and sea-boots.
But my son Hephaestus whom I bare was weakly among all the blessed gods and shrivelled of foot, a shame and disgrace to me in heaven, whom I myself took in my hands and cast out so that he fell in the great sea.
But all was glassy calm, each great sea, of all the orderly procession of great seas, heaving up, round-topped and mountainous, like so much quicksilver.
We would stay and take your little hands in ours, but the murmur of the great sea is in our ears and we may not linger.
But above all he longed to fight the Spaniards, who were the great sea kings of those days.
Jessie was so earnest in her motherly anxiety that her voice faltered over the last words, and she hugged the yellow heads closer in her arms, as if she feared to let them leave that safe harbour for the great sea where so many little boats go down.
He may have thought of the size of his cabin, or - unconsciously, perhaps - have conjured up a vision of a vessel so small tossing amongst the great seas.
It is a fresh-water lake, shallow, and free from the larger reptiles which make the use of the great seas of Pellucidar impossible for any but their own kind.
Is it peradventure that manner of thing which of late the unbelievers have brought from over the great seas, which, being boiled in oil, and an onion and salt added thereto, doth --"