great seal

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great seal

n.
The principal seal of a government or state, with which official documents are stamped.

great seal

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (often capitals) the principal seal of a nation, sovereign, etc, used to authenticate signatures and documents of the highest importance

great′ seal′


n.
1. the principal seal of a government or state.
2. (caps.)
a. the Lord Chancellor, keeper of the principal seal of Great Britain.
b. the office of the Lord Chancellor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.great seal - the principal seal of a government, symbolizing authority or sovereigntygreat seal - the principal seal of a government, symbolizing authority or sovereignty
seal, stamp - a device incised to make an impression; used to secure a closing or to authenticate documents
References in classic literature ?
It is signed 'Ozma of Oz,'" continued the rabbit, "and is sealed with the Great Seal of the Emerald City.
The loss of the crown jewels or the Great Seal of England could have brought no greater consternation to a British king than did the pilfering of the sacred knife bring to La, the Oparian, Queen and High Priestess of the degraded remnants of the oldest civilization upon earth.
1st, The man-mountain shall not depart from our dominions, without our license under our great seal.
We walked to town, my sister leading the way in a very large beaver bonnet, and carrying a basket like the Great Seal of England in plaited straw, a pair of pattens, a spare shawl, and an umbrella, though it was a fine bright day.
When Eudosia was fairly in possession of a hundred-dollar pocket-handkerchief, the great seal might be said to be attached to the document that was to elevate the Halfacres throughout all future time.
He was born in a fine house and was the child of great people, his father being Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal.
We ran on to the north and west till we raised the coast of Japan and picked up with the great seal herd.
The grants of land, made either by the crown or the state, were but letters patent under the great seal, and the term “patent” is usually applied to any district of extent thus conceded; though under the crown’, manorial rights being often granted with the soil, in the older counties the word “manor” is frequently used.