Great Depression

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Great Depression

n.
The period of declining and lower economic activity in the worldwide economy from the late 1920s through the 1930s. In the United States, it began with the stock market crash in October 1929 and was characterized by a decline in business activity into 1933.
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Noun1.Great Depression - the economic crisis beginning with the stock market crash in 1929 and continuing through the 1930sGreat Depression - the economic crisis beginning with the stock market crash in 1929 and continuing through the 1930s
2.Great Depression - a period during the 1930s when there was a worldwide economic depression and mass unemployment
References in classic literature ?
It was about this time that Martin took a great slump in Maria's estimation.
The Committee submitted its visions and recommendations on the policies and programs included in the draft state budget, which aim at addressing the financial condition resulting from the great slump in oil revenues.
This was the time of the Great Slump when our heavy industries, the backbone of the region, were crumbling like the streets of shabby housing around them, sending unemployed figures rocketing.
The region was in the depths of the Great Slump and he saw "monuments of mean ugliness" in Durham, the "hideous muddle" of North Shields, and likened Shotton to a "smoking tip of a volcano" and Hebburn to Doomsday.

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