inequality

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in·e·qual·i·ty

 (ĭn′ĭ-kwŏl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. in·e·qual·i·ties
1.
a. The condition of being unequal.
b. An instance of being unequal.
2.
a. Lack of equality, as of opportunity, treatment, or status.
b. Social or economic disparity: the growing inequality between rich and poor.
3. Lack of smoothness or regularity; unevenness.
4. Variability; changeability.
5. Mathematics An algebraic relation showing that a quantity is greater than or less than another quantity.
6. Astronomy A deviation from uniformity in the apparent motion of a celestial body.

inequality

(ˌɪnɪˈkwɒlɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being unequal; disparity
2. an instance of disparity
3. lack of smoothness or regularity
4. social or economic disparity
5. (Mathematics) maths
a. a statement indicating that the value of one quantity or expression is not equal to another, as in xy
b. a relationship between real numbers involving inequality: x may be greater than y, denoted by x>y, or less than y, denoted by x<y
6. (Astronomy) astronomy a departure from uniform orbital motion

in•e•qual•i•ty

(ˌɪn ɪˈkwɒl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the condition of being unequal; lack of equality; disparity.
2. injustice; partiality.
3. unevenness, as of surface.
4. an instance of unevenness.
5. variableness, as of climate.
6.
a. any component part of the departure from uniformity in astronomical phenomena, esp. in orbital motion.
b. the amount of such a departure.
7. a statement that two quantities are unequal, indicated by the symbol ≠; alternatively, by the symbol <, signifying that the quantity preceding the symbol is less than that following, or by the symbol >, signifying that the quantity preceding the symbol is greater than that following.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inequality - lack of equality; "the growing inequality between rich and poor"
difference - the quality of being unlike or dissimilar; "there are many differences between jazz and rock"
nonequivalence - not interchangeable
disparity - inequality or difference in some respect
unevenness - the quality of being unbalanced
equality - the quality of being the same in quantity or measure or value or status

inequality

noun disparity, prejudice, difference, bias, diversity, irregularity, unevenness, lack of balance, disproportion, imparity, preferentiality corruption and social inequality
Quotations
"All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others" [George Orwell Animal Farm]
"Whatever may be the general endeavor of a community to render its members equal and alike, the personal pride of individuals will always seek to rise above the line, and to form somewhere an inequality to their own advantage" [Alexis de Tocqueville Democracy in America]

inequality

noun
1. The condition or fact of being unequal, as in age, rank, or degree:
2. Lack of smoothness or regularity:
Translations
لا مُساواه، تَفاوُت
nerovnost
ulighed
epätasa-arvo
ójöfnuîur
nelygybė
nevienlīdzība
olikhet
eşitsizlik

inequality

[ˌɪnɪˈkwɒlɪtɪ] Ndesigualdad f
inequality of wealth/between nationsla desigualdad en el reparto de la riqueza/entre naciones

inequality

[ˌɪniˈkwɒlɪti] ninégalité f

inequality

n (= lack of equality)Ungleichheit f; (= instance of inequality)Unterschied m; great inequalities in wealthgroße Unterschiede plin der Verteilung von Reichtum; inequality of opportunityChancenungleichheit f; inequality of opportunity in educationUngleichheit fder Bildungschancen

inequality

[ˌɪnɪˈkwɒlɪtɪ] n (gen) → ineguaglianza, disuguaglianza (Math) → disuguaglianza

inequality

(iniˈkwoləti) noun
(a case of) the existence of differences in size, value etc between two or more objects etc. There is bound to be inequality between a manager's salary and a workman's wages.
References in classic literature ?
It is greater than the stars--that moving procession of human energy; greater than the palpitating earth and the things growing thereon.
The variability, however, in the successive generations of mongrels is, perhaps, greater than in hybrids.
And let no prince measure the danger of them by this, whether they be just or unjust: for that were to imagine people, to be too reasonable; who do often spurn at their own good: nor yet by this, whether the griefs whereupon they rise, be in fact great or small: for they are the most dangerous discontentments, where the fear is greater than the feeling.
Excessive honours are also a cause of sedition when one person or more are greater than the state and the power of the government can permit; for then a monarchy or a dynasty is usually established: on which account the ostracism was introduced in some places, as at Argos and Athens: though it is better to guard against such excesses in the founding of a state, than when they have been permitted to take place, to correct them afterward.
High percentage of water decline was found in decreasing order; Ghuray Wari greater than Gorho greater than Allah Wari greater than Nur Aseel greater than Toto greater than Asul Khurmo as the fruit proceeded towards the maturing stage.
They are as follows: (1) tachycardia was defined as a rate greater than 90/rain, with normal defined as 60 to 90/min; (2) short PR interval was identified as less than 0.
Abortion rates fell among all teenagers in Texas after a parental notification law for minors took effect in the state at the beginning of 2000, but declines among young women who were subject to the law were greater than declines among those who were not.
Naturally, in the Protestant areas north of the River Main and in South Germany as well, the Liberals (whether the left Liberal parties or the National Liberal Party) had successes comparable to and even greater than those of the liberal radicals in Catholic South Germany, and in certain areas they put out a radical platform resembling that of the South German radicals.
Some individuals with baseline viral loads greater than 100,000 copies/mL needed at least 36 weeks to achieve viral loads less than 50 copies/mL.
Being more than 20 percent above ideal body weight or having a body mass index (BMI) of greater than or equal to 27.
In the National Reference Center in France, the diagnosis of acute infection is supported by IgG phase II [is greater than or equal to] 1:200, IgM phase II [is greater than or equal to] 1:50; and of chronic disease, IgG phase I [is greater than or equal to] 1:800 (11).

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